Schedule for English 300W (Winter 2009)

Section I: Psychoanalytic and Feminist Criticism (Fiction Case Study)

January 5:

Introduction of Students & Class; Conjectural Response

1. Do the homework for next class (described adjacent to the day due).

January 12:

Discuss Hawthorne & Literary Criticism, Workshop Elements of Fiction

1. Get books and review the syllabus, noting down any questions that you still have;

2. After reading, “Responding Actively” (12-33), “Approaches to Literature” (14-17), and “New Criticism” (38-48) in the Electronic Reserves (ER), http://reserves.emich.edu/, password 300, closely read and heavily annotate Nathaniel Hawthorne’s short story “The Birthmark” (259-78) found in the same place;

3. Make sure to print the ER materials, especially the short story, and bring them to class;

4. Optional but recommended reading: “What is Reader Response Criticism?” (ER 51-61).

January 19:

Discuss Carter, Freud, Psychoanalysis, & Responses

No Class: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

January 26:

1. After reading “Psychoanalysis” in How to Interpret Literature (HL), p. 101-18, the abridged version of Sigmund Freud’s “The ‘Uncanny’” (ER 1-12), and “Introduction to Fiction” (ER 17-21), closely read and heavily annotate Angela Carter’s “The Bloody Chamber” (ER 7-41);

2. Write a 2-paragraph response incorporating at least one quote from the Freud essay, focusing on different aspects of the Carter story depending on your group number:

Group 1:  Character motivations and conflicts, unconscious or otherwise (including foils, imagoes, or doubles);

Group 2:  The possible repressed “latent” content for the characters, narrator, reader, author, or larger culture;

Group 3:  Significance of the setting (e.g. time period, exterior/interior spaces, buildings, historical or cultural context);

Group 4:  The narrative structure and/or point of view, including any irony, foreshadowing, or motifs;

Group 5: Symbolization and theme (the underlying message about the key issues that the story principally foregrounds).

3. Optional but recommended reading: E. T. A. Hoffmann’s “The Sandman” (ER).

February 2:

 Discuss Feminism & Representations of Women, Groupwork Questions

1. Read “What is Feminist Criticism?” (ER 79-91), Naomi Wolf’s “Beauty Myth” (ER 179-87), and John Berger’s “Ways of Seeing” (ER 97-105);

2. Bring two copies of a discussion question (or a set of questions) for your peers to consider in class (one copy anonymously if you like), with those question(s) focusing on different topics depending on your group number: psychological aspects of the Hawthorne story (Group 1); psychological aspects of the Carter story (Group 2); gender dynamics in the Hawthorne story (Group 3); gender dynamics in the Carter story (Group 4); and a combination of psychological and gender issues in either story (Group 5).

February 9:

Wrap up Feminism & Psychoanalysis; Introduce Poetry; Workshop Outlines; Watch Clips from Zizek! and Derrida

1. Read “Writing about Poetry” (ER), “MLA on Titles and Quotations” (ER 102-7), and “Drafting your Essay” (ER 27-38);

2. Open and read the Sample Essay file (/samp.doc or, if necessary, /samp.rtf) and then save a copy under a new file name on your own disk or computer;

3. Use the saved file to compose your Essay One outline, deleting the existing words (including the header) and inserting the information appropriate for your own essay in its place (see the Essay Requirements: /req.htm).  You can use this file as a template for all of your essays so long as you do not change any of the settings (for convenience, save it in the “Briefcase” folder of your my.emich account: https://mail.emich.edu/);

4. The outline must include a title indicative of your topic, an introduction, a sentence-length thesis statement, 3-4 topic sentences, and a list of supporting details or quotes for at least one body paragraph;

5. Email the outline as an attachment to acoykenda at emich.edu by 10 AM 2/9.

Section II: Marxism and Deconstruction (Poetry Case Study)

February 16:

Introduction to Marxism, Discuss (and Unpack) Marx, Peer Editing

1. Read the abridged version of Marx’s “Meaning of Human Requirements” (ER 93-97), “What is Marxist Criticism?” (ER 416-27), as well as “Definitions of Some Marxist Terms” (ER);

2. Complete the draft of Essay One to the point where you have at least 4 complete paragraphs, including a revised introduction (with a solid thesis) and properly formatted quotes from 2 different theorists (Freud, Berger, Wolf);

3. Email the complete draft to acoykenda at emich.edu by class time and bring TWO physical copies of it to class for peer editing (one of the copies anonymously if you prefer);

4. After the peer workshop in class, review the first 10 of the “Top 20 Composition Errors” online (http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/easy writer3e/20errors/1.asp) and polish Essay One (4 pages), submit the final draft of your essay through the Turn it In Website: http://www.turnitin.com/ *** The final version is due by 8:00 AM on 2/27 at the latest. 

February 23:

No Class: Winter Recess

March 2:

Begin Deconstruction, Discuss Baudrillard & hooks, Workshop Song Lyrics

1. Read “Deconstruction and Post-Structural Analysis” (ER 161-69), the excerpt from Jean Baudrillard’s “Simulacra and Simulations” (ER 1-5), and the abridged “Postmodern Blackness” by bell hooks (ER 1-4);

2. After reading the Section Two Poems (ER), closely read and heavily annotate the lyrics of any song of your choice, making sure to bring a clean copy of the lyrics to class for your peers to review.

March 9:

Discuss Cultural Studies, Haraway, & Responses

1. Begin reading “Historicism and Cultural Studies” (HL 218-26) and then read the abridged “Cyborg Manifesto”  by Donna Haraway (ER 1-14), paying close attention to the imagery, symbolism, and other poetic devices;

2. Write a 2-paragraph response on a Section Two (ER) poem of your choice, quoting Marx if you are in Group 1, Haraway if you are in Group 2, Baudrillard if you are in Group 3, hooks if you are in Group 4, and either Haraway, Baudrillard, or hooks if you are in Groups 5. **Groups 1-2 should use a roughly (though not necessarily rigorously) marxist approach to analyze the poem, while Groups 3-5 should do the same with a deconstructive approach.

March 16:

Discuss Essays & Writing Technique; Introduction to Drama & Williams

1. After you finish reading “Historicism and Cultural Studies” (HL 27-37), begin “Introduction to Drama” (839-47) and Tennessee Williams’ Streetcar Named Desire (3-69);

2. Adapting the Sample Essay file from before (/samp.doc), email an outline for Essay Two as an attachment to acoykenda at emich.edu by 10:00 AM 3/20, including a title indicative of your topic, an introduction, a sentence-length thesis statement, 3-4 topic sentences, and a list of supporting details or quotes for at least one body paragraph (see /req.htm for essay guidelines).

Section III: Post-Colonial, Queer, and Cultural Studies (Drama Case Study)

March 23:

Discuss Said, Shohat, & Streetcar Named Desire; Peer Editing

1. After you finish reading “Introduction to Drama” (848-55), read the abridged versions of Edward Said’s “Imagined Geography” (ER 1-4) and Ella Shohat’s “Tropes of Empire” (ER 1-4);

2. Continue reading Streetcar Named Desire (70-128) paying attention to the various tropes found in the play that Said and/or Shohat discuss;

3. Complete a draft of Essay Two to the point where you have at least 4 complete paragraphs (including a revised introduction with a solid thesis), as well as quotes (properly formatted) from 2 theorists (Marx, Barthes, or hooks);

4. Email the draft to acoykenda at emich.edu by class time, bringing TWO additional copies to class for peer editing (one copy anonymously if you prefer);

5. Review the last 10 of the “Top 20 Composition Errors” (http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/easywriter3e/20errors/1.asp), polish Essay Two (4 pages), and then , submit the final draft of your essay through the Turn it In Website: http://www.turnitin.com/  *** The final version is due by 8:00 AM on 3/31 at the latest.

March 30:

Meet in the Halle Library (Room 110) for the Research Demo

1. Read “Postcolonial and Race Studies” (HL 240-3, 248-59) and “Queer Studies” (HL 162-9, 71-83);

2. After reviewing the handouts on the Research Essay (/guide.htm), finish reading Tennessee Williams’ Streetcar Named Desire (130-79);

3. Come to the research demo in the library (during regular class time) with a list of four possible topics to research for Essay Three relating to the cultural or historical context of Streetcar Named Desire. Make two copies of your list and be prepared to turn one of them in at the beginning of class

4. Optional but recommended reading/viewing: Tennessee Williams’ Suddenly Last Summer (ER), which  you can write about for Essay Three instead of Streetcar if you like), Pedro Almodóvar’s All about My Mother (loose film adaptation of Streetcar), and the cinematic versions of Streetcar and Suddenly.  All of the films are on reserve at the library; the script of Suddenly Last Summer is in the ER.

April 6:

Discuss Williams, Research, & Butler; Workshop with the film version of Streetcar Named Desire

1. Read “Research Essays” (ER 258-75), “Research and DocumentationPart I (ER), and the abridged version of Judith Butler’s “Gender Trouble” (ER 2488-501);

2. Send the following in an email attachment to acoykenda at emich.edu by 10 AM on 4/6:

a. A description of the main topic or topics that you are considering writing about for Essay Three;

b. A survey of the main question(s) that you want your research (and resulting essay) to answer;

c.  A description of the main historical and/or cultural information (not including Williams’ biography) that you plan to investigate to further guide your research and make your argument convincing;

d. A description of one specific concept from at least one of the theorists that you plan to use as a source (Said, Shohat, or Butler). This concept needs to be expressed in your own words, with a representative quote (and corresponding page number) written out for comparison;

e. A description of three of the following sources, excluding one of your choice.  Each requires an illustrative quote written out for comparison, as well as the corresponding author name, essay/book/journal title(s), and page numbers:

i.   A description of one specific piece of relevant information from a book on reserve at the library about Williams (listed under “Coykendall”);

ii.  A description of one specific argument from a theoretical work recommended for “Further Reading” on pg. 297-303 of the How to book (not including the texts listed under “Marxism”);

iii.  A work anthologized in The Critical Tradition or Norton Anthology of Theory and Criticism, both on reserve at the library;

iv.   A book chapter or article of literary criticism listed in the MLA Bibliography focusing on Williams’ Streetcar. 

April 13:

Discuss Williams, Discussion Questions, & MLA Documentation; Continue film clips from Streetcar Named Desire

1. After reading “Research and Documentation Part II (ER), print out a Works Cited page to bring to class that includes the necessary bibliographic information for Williams' play, as well as for your other Essay Three sources (items d-e from last week’s homework), properly formatted according to MLA conventions. (Treat the ER materials as webpages, not as the original sources from which those texts come);

2. Write down two copies of a discussion question (or set of questions) for your peers to consider in class (one with your name on it and another anonymously if you like), with the question(s) focusing on different aspects of Williams’ Streetcar depending on your group number: historical (Group 1), cultural (Group 2), sexual/gendered (Group 3), racial (Group 4), and colonial (Group 5);

3. Finish all outstanding homework (or extra-credit responses) by the next class;

4. Optional but recommended reading: “Writing about Film” (ER 243-53).

April 20:

Research Presentations

1. Prepare for a brief, 5-min. presentation about your topic, thesis, research, and critical approach for the final class (see Guidelines on the essay: /guide.htm);

2. *** The final version of Essay Three (4½ pgs) is due by 8:00 AM on 4/25 at the latest. Submit the final draft of your essay through the Turn it In Website: http://www.turnitin.com/

April 25:

Essay Three Due April 25 (8 AM)