Table of Contents

Unit Rationale

Theoretical Support………………………………………………………………………………………………………1-4

Instructional Content…………………………………………………………………………………………………………5

List of Representative Goals……………………………………………………………………………………………6

Objectives Reflecting “Best Practices”

·        Reading…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….7

·        Writing……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..8

·        Literature…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………9

Overview of Lesson Plans……………………………………………………………………………………….10-12

Overview of Projects…………………………………………………………………………………………………13-15

 

Explanation of Assessments……………………………………………………………………………………16-17

List of Assessments…………………………………………………………………………………………………………18

List of Sample Texts………………………………………………………………………………………………..19-28

 

Curriculum Map/Chart

Reading, Writing, Literature……………………………………………………………………………………29-31

 

Lesson Plans

Overview of Week 1 …………………………………………………………………………………32

Lesson1: “Dare to Narrate”………………………………………………………………33-40

Lesson 2: “The Need to Read”…………………………………………………………41-46

Lesson3: “Affixes are a Word’s Best Friend”…………………………………47-52

Lesson 4: “Deconstructing Douglass”………………………………………………53-57

Lesson5: “The Third-Person’s Turn”………………………………………………58-63

 

Overview of Week 2 …………………………………………………………………………………….64

Lesson6: “Speaking of Speeches…”…………………………………………………65-69

Lesson7: “How Do You Value Reading?”…………………………………………70-72

Lesson8: “The Need to Succeed: Determination”…………………………73-81

Lesson9: “Tales and Their Tellers”…………………………………………………82-87

Lesson10: “Preach Your Speech”…………………………………………………88-89

 

Overview of Week 3 …………………………………………………………………………90

Lesson11: “Searching for Words”………………………………………………..94-100

Lesson12: “I’m talkin’ to YOU!”……………………………………………………101-106

Lesson13: “Everybody’s Got a Different Story to Tell”………107-113

Lesson14: “Turning TV into Biography”…………………………………114-122

Lesson15: “Either ya know, or ya don’t!”…………………………………123-134

Formal/Summative Assessments

“Value of Reading” Collage……………………………………………………………………46

Speech Research Presentation…………………………………………………………68-69

Unit Portfolio……………………………………………………………………………………119-120

Comprehensive Exam………………………………………………………………………124-134

Bibliography……………………………………………………135

 

 

Theoretical Support

 

This unit focuses on various genres of African American literature—all with the underlying theme of determination.  African American culture is strongly embedded in our society.  The progression of equality for all Americans has deterred many notions of racism and segregation, but nonetheless, these notions and feelings still exist within our American culture. Students must become educated and aware of the struggles and achievements of many African Americans. “There are two major purposes for including multiethnic and multicultural literature into our school literature programs: to develop our students’ knowledge of and respect for the extraordinary religious, racial, and ethnic diversity of American citizens, and to enhance their familiarity with and appreciation of the literary traditions of other peoples in countries around the world.” (Strosky, 1994, p.28) As the unit study emphasizes, knowledge is power. In order for students to make educated, well-informed choices and actions related to discrimination and racism in their lives, they must be aware of the history of the culture’s development.  Not only must students come to appreciate and recognize these struggles and achievements, but they must also be able to identify key acts and events that mark progression in the fight for equality:

…reframing of a historic and complex issue recast the traditional policy debate from how best to uplift the Negro economically to how to arouse Americans from their moral slumber over the gap between democratic beliefs and racist behavior.  The intellectual reframing of the situation of course, became a basis for the moral authority of the civil rights movement in the 1960s and its leaders’ extraordinary success in reducing the distance between Americans’ ideals, and racial practices, a struggle that continues today. (Cuban, 1992, p. 8)

Desegregation may exist within American school systems, but discrimination is still prevalent in the hearts, attitudes, and minds of many Americans. Student should become educated about various cultures, their economic struggles, and their right to live in a democratic and diverse society.  Through the use of multiple genres in classic and modern African American literature, students will gain an appreciation for the legendary traditions of story telling, and the historical accounts of narratives rooted in the culture’s struggle and progression. This unit will engage the students in multiple genres of readings and activities that center around the concept of equality, determination, and knowledge of a culture’s history in America.

            This unit uses multiple genres of literature in order to broaden students’ perspectives and educate them about narrative functions.  Rather than one simple text, or one piece of literature, this unit will expose the students to multiple genres of literature. “Anything you read—a short story in an airline magazine, the front of the National Inquirer, a new novel, the latest poem, a book your own children ask you to read, the writing of an African poet—is a potential candidate for the curriculum.” (Purves, Rodgers &Soter, 1995,  p. 78) Not only will the students read contemporary and classic literature, but they will also use news articles, television, rap lyrics and other forms of texts in order to engage their interest and to expand their reading perspectives.

Some of the assignments allow the students to independently choose what texts they will read in order to complete their writing assignments. The assignments are only unified in the use of narrative perspectives or topic—what the students choose to write is up to them:

If the first cardinal rule is “Give students some real choice of assignments so that they want to do them and you can be sure that any problems will result from true compositional difficulties, not from poor motivation,” the second cardinal rule is “Put writing to some realistic use after it is done, and make clear in advance writing what that purpose and audience are.” Assignment directions and directions should stipulate purpose if it’s not distinctly implied there or elsewhere.  (Moffett, 1981,  p.25)

 

There is no reason that all students should be expected to write the same texts in the same way; students must be allowed to make choices that will make them comfortable in their writing endeavors. Also, students must be given the freedom to write pieces that are prevalent to their lives. “Don’t assume that only some books are for the ‘bright’ students and some for the ‘dummies.’…Above all you can have your students make their own selections. Don’t forget that independent reading is one of the goals...” (Purves, Rodgers &Soter, 1995,  p.78) Many of the readings and assignments focus on the students’ opinions, beliefs and thoughts—while using the unit concepts and literature as a foundation. It’s important for students to be able to integrate their own voice and thoughts into their reading and writing practices. 

Students must also be made aware of the purposes for their writing activities; they need to know why it’s important for them to complete certain writing assignments. 

“Rather than merely empathizing (or not) with a particular character, for example, students can be taught to question how specific readings are produced, and why.” (Mellor & Patterson, 2000,  p.516) Students must be exposed to various perspectives and purposes in writing in order to intrigue their interest of writing functions. Through an increased understanding of writing objectives, students will be able to understand the purpose and expected intentions in their writing activities.  All of the assignment direction sheets in this unit provide not only the directions, but also the purpose for the activities that the students are expected to complete.

The unit assignments focus on various genres of writing, which correlate and integrate the multiple types of readings used in the unit’s study. It’s essential for students to be exposed to various genres of literature and texts, so that they are better able to formulate their own opinions and approaches for reading various types of texts. Reading is a prevalent activity in the lives of many students, and it doesn’t primarily center on novels, or textbooks, but rather their daily reading ventures involve multiple types of texts. If students aren’t solely exposed to one type of text in their daily lives, then why would a teacher want to only use one type of text in the classroom? Shouldn’t the classroom experience become an impetus that will prepare students to become educated and informed members of our society as a whole? 

Each student must be given an equal opportunity to learn, an equal opportunity to engage in classroom practices and procedures. Multiple texts provide students with the opportunity to comprehend the theme or concept of the unit, while using texts that are appropriate for their individual learning levels:

Engaging all students in a themed study or unit is a challenge that teachers can resolve by using materials that match students’ independent or instructional reading levels. So, when students face textbooks that are above their reading levels, teachers can help them access the required information by filling their classrooms with multiple texts that vary in readability level, allowing every learner to read and participate.  (Robb, 2002,  p.28)

 

No two students are exactly alike, and no two students learn at the same pace, at the same level, or with the same material. A classroom that is filled with multiple learning level students must also include multiple learning procedures, texts, and activities. The opportunity for student success can be measured by the extent of opportunities provided.

Not only should students be exposed to multiple genres of literature, but they must also work with, read, and write multiple genres from various narrative perspectives. Student achievement must also be assessed in various forms. Summative assessments are a great way to gage the students’ understanding of material, but other assessments types need to be included. If the students are being exposed to multiple forms of reading and writing in order to access the most suitable methods of individual learning, then it seems only appropriate that their assessments should provide multiple measurement techniques. This unit not only uses summative assessments, but it also uses performance, reflection, and comprehensive assessments (assessments further explained in the assessment section).

The main objective for using multiple perspectives in reading, writing and assessments is to provide the students with the most appropriate opportunities for academic success. The use of multiple texts can help students further their knowledge of content area studies, and it also gives those students who are not confident readers the ability to read text with lower reading levels. Multiple genres of reading and writing practices will provide the students with a better chance for equal opportunities to learn, and help those students who aren’t proficient readers to engage in suitable reading strategies.

Multiple texts enable teachers to offer students books they can read, improve students’ application of reading-thinking strategies, build confidence, and develop the motivation to learn. By using multiple texts, all students have the opportunity to learn new information and make meaningful contributions to discussions. Moreover, varied texts provide multiple perspectives that help students rethink events and issues that impact everyone and deepen their knowledge of literary genres. (Robb, 2002,  p.32)

 

This unit uses multiple genres of literature as a foundation for growth and progress in student achievement and interest.  Students must become readily engaged in class discussion, participation, and topic interest. The use of multiple perspectives in reading and writing expands student knowledge and abilities to comprehend course material.  The more ways that knowledge is made available, the more availability the students will have to that knowledge.

 

 

 

 Instructional Context

 

·        Type of school: Semi-urban Public High School

·        Level: 9th Grade

·        Demographic description:

Middle Class, 20% qualify for free or reduced lunch. Diverse environment with a broad mix of students: male, female, app. 30%African American, 5%Asian, 5%Indian, 5%Middle Eastern, 50%Caucasion, 5% other.

·        Course Title:  9th Grade English

 

 

List of Representative Goals

 

 

Reading

·        Students will frequently read a variety of texts in order to develop expertise in reading.

·        Students will read multiple genres of literature in order to expand their reading perspectives, and to expose them to multiple reading level materials.

 

Writing

·        Students will become proficient writers in order to effectively convey their ideas through writing.

·        Students will compose multiple genres of writing in order to discover the most effective techniques for writing strategies.

 

Literature

·        Students will use multiple types of African American literature to gain an appreciation for such literature’s content.

·        Students will be exposed to the general concepts of slavery and the Civil Rights Movement in order to expand their knowledge of the event’s history.

 

 

 

Objectives Reflecting “Best practices”

 

Reading:

Reading Comprehension is currently one of the most controversial topics of debate in education. There has been so mush speculation about what reading comprehension is, how to measure it, and how to improve it. This is definitely an area with no quick fix answers, and there isn’t a “one-approach solution”. This unit focuses on continual reading strategies and constant reading practices. In order for students to become expert readers, they must learn how to make reading a prominent activity in their lives. Students may, at first, feel uncomfortable with a heavy reading load, but the more frequently they read, the more comfortable they will become in their reading practices. It’s also important for students to know what they’re reading about; if they are constantly exposed to material that is far past their reading level, then they will easily become discouraged. This semester’s curriculum will engage the students in continual, daily reading practices.

·        Students will be able to develop expertise in reading, such as: reading comprehension; analyzing word structure; and identifying key concepts of text construction—through constant exposure to various types of texts.

 

Students must be given a purpose for their reading endeavors; they need to know why it’s important for them to read what they’re reading.  Multiple genres of reading will expose the students to numerous types of reading material. When students read, they must become familiar with the purposes of texts. If students become familiar with the different purposes of various texts, then they will be able to comprehend the text material at a faster rate and with a deeper understanding.  Throughout the semester, the students will be asked to identify the various purposes and uses for perspectives in their reading assignments. 

·        Students will be able to identify multiple perspectives and the various purposes for constructing multiple types of literature, e.g., to persuade; to tell stories; to express feelings and emotions; to present issues for concern; to inform, etc.—in order to conceive the most appropriate concepts when reading literature.

 

Objectives Reflecting “Best practices”

Writing:

Good writing style isn’t something that’s achieved overnight; it takes a lot of practice.  As with reading comprehension, there is no “one way” to teach writing style. Students must develop their own writing style, at their own pace.  This unit focuses heavily on the clarity and purpose of effective writing. If the students are able to identify the main objectives and purposes for their writing, then they will be far more likely to communicate their ideas and thoughts effectively.  As with any developed talent, constant practice is the best key to substantial achievement. The more students practice writing, the more comfortable and confident they will become. Throughout this unit, and the semester, students will be exposed to constant writing practices in order for them to develop an idiosyncratic method of writing techniques, style, and voice.

·        Students will be able to write effectively, e.g., thoroughly communicate ideas; articulate meaning through writing tone and voice; develop a strong writing style; and fluidity in writing; —through constant writing practices, in order to become proficient writers.

 

In order for the above goal to be achieved, students must be given flexibility with their writing practices. With so many various genres of literature available, it’s essential that students not only read a multitude of texts, but that they learn how to write using various methods of purpose.  Also, in order for students to discover their individual writing style and tone, they must be exposed to a broad range of writing practices in various genres; this will allow them to find the genres and narrative perspectives that they are most comfortable with. The semester’s curriculum will require students to write multiple genres of texts—they must learn to adapt to various writing techniques and narratives.

·        Students will be able to compose multiple types of texts, e.g., short stories, summaries, narratives, poems, drama, biographies, song lyrics, speeches—in order to discover the most effective techniques for writing strategies.

 

 

 

 

Objectives Reflecting “Best practices”

Literature:

The history of African American Literature is so richly embedded in our society. Students must be exposed to the struggles and hardships that, not only slaves, but many African Americans have endured. Through such exposure, students will gain an appreciation and understanding of the culture and the fight for equality.  Students will be exposed to various genres of African American Literate in order to enhance their appreciation for the texts, and also to ensure their comprehension of the material. Racism and still exits in our society, and it’s important for students to become educated about the precarious effects that discrimination can and has caused. Students should learn to value the determination, and the uprising of those who have fought for equality and justice of mankind. The semester’s curriculum will integrate the histories of multiple cultures, in order to create an educated democratic and diverse society.  Students must learn to appreciate and value the differences of individual cultures.

·        Students will be able to value various types of African American Literature, e.g. slave narratives, folklore, speeches, drama, rap, and poems, etc. to gain an appreciation for struggles, literacy, determination and perseverance that are embodied in the literature’s content.

It’s important for students to not only become familiar with the key people, places, and events associated with the white male dominant culture, but they must also be exposed to other authors and events that are, nonetheless, still prominent in our culture as Americans.  The concept of equality had been an issue for centuries. In order for students to continue the fight for equality in their own lives, they must become educated with the history of progression, so that they are able to make educated, well-constructed opinions and decisions. Not only will students become familiar with the hardships that many African Americans faced, but also throughout the semester they will become familiar with many other culture’s (Native Americans, Latin Americans, Indians, Jewish, Asians, etc.) progressions of equality, and the struggles that they’ve endured.

·        Students will be able to identify key people, key events and dates involved with the progression of racial equality in America, e.g., slavery, the Middle Passage, Frederick Douglass, Martin Luther King Jr., The Civil Rights Movement, in order to expand their knowledge of the event’s history.

 

Overview of Lesson Plans

 

Lesson#1: The teacher will introduce the class to the new unit study, and go over the class notes about the various types of narration and biographies, and then there will be a group discussion about the reading from Olaudah Equiano. Finally, the teacher will explain the assignment direction sheet details for the Middle Passage First-person narration assignment.

 

Lesson#2: The teacher will introduce Frederick Douglass and give a brief overview of his life and his success, and then the students will take turns reading selected sections of Chapter IIV of The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass out loud. After the students have read the text out loud, the teacher will discuss key concepts of Douglass’ achievements in reading. The teacher will then tell the students about found poems and have them write one. Lastly, the students will be given directions for their reading-value collages, and will begin working on them.

 

Lesson#3: The teacher will introduce the students to suffixes and prefixes and go over the in class note sheet. The students will then be given an affix sheet to work on in class. After that, the teacher will go over some word deconstruction techniques, and will give the students the word deconstruction homework sheet.

 

Lesson#4: The teacher will hand out the word deconstruction direction sheet, and the students will do an in-class assignment relating to it, then the teacher will hand out the word definition homework sheet. Next, the teacher will have the students read the two poems about Frederick Douglass aloud, and after that, they will form small groups and answers some questions about the poems’ meanings.

 

Lesson#5: The class will have a discussion about the group work from the previous day. After the class discussion, the teacher will go over the in class fill-in-the-blank note sheet about third-person narration, and then the teacher should hand out the binder requirements sheet. Finally, the students will be asked to write an in-class reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third-person perspective. For homework, the students will be asked to write a poem about Frederick Douglass from a third-person omniscient point of view that will be due the next class period.

 

Lesson#6: The teacher will have the students read their poems and parts of the speech reading assignments aloud, and then they will form groups to discuss the variations between first-person perspectives. The teacher will hand out the speech presentation research assignment and explain.                 

 

Lesson#7: The teacher will lead a class discussion about the topics from the previous day’s group discussion answers, then the students will present and explain their reading collages. Also, the teacher will handout article homework sheet.

 

Lesson#8: The teacher will have the students get into groups and brainstorm, and then they will read the lyrics to a song, listen to it, and fill out the three-level guide, and finally they will write a cinquain poem. Students will be given the song writing homework sheet.

 

Lesson#9: The teacher will ask for volunteers to read their songs out loud, hand out the different level question sheet, have the students read selected folktales out loud, and finally, the students will get into groups and discuss folktales.

 

Lesson#10: The students will present their speeches.

 

Lesson#11: The teacher will ask for volunteers to read folktales, the class will discuss the group answers on the folktale readings, and then the class will go to the media center so the students can use the computers for an on-line vocabulary scavenger hunt.

 

Lesson#12: The teacher will go over the in class notes, read a poem out loud, and will discuss key concepts of drama script (drama vs. narrative). The students will form groups and answer the questions on the group worksheet. The teacher will hand out second-person perspective homework assignment.

 

Lesson#13: The teacher will go over the discussion questions from the previous day and then students will watch the same part of two different movies based on the play “A Raisin in the Sun”. Finally, the students will be given the perspective worksheet as homework.

 

Lesson#14: The teacher will give a brief review of elements in a biography. Also the teacher will discuss Maya Angelou with the class. The students will then read the selected poems out loud. The teacher will hand out the binder/portfolio requirement direction sheet, and will review for the unit exam.

 

Lesson#15: The teacher will collect the TV—Bio homework, and will hand out the unit exam.

 

 

Overview of Projects

 

Completed In class note sheets: Throughout the unit, the students will be given fill-in-the-blank notes sheets, which they will fill out as the teacher introduces and explains various concepts. These note sheets are used to help guide the students through the direct lesson material; they are used to assure that the students have proper notes and information to use when studying for the exam. They may also use these notes to refer back to during different projects and assignments.

·        Narration Part I: First-person

·        Affixation

·        Narration Part II: Third-person

·        Narration Part III: Second-person

 

Completed Group Assignment Sheets: Throughout the unit, students will be asked to form groups and fill out the group question sheets. The students should discuss the questions on the sheets and answer them as a group. The group questions are based on various readings and highlight the main focus of those readings. Although this is a group assignment, each student is required to fill out a separate sheet with the group answers; this is done to insure that each student has, at the very least, been exposed to the questions and the answers (despite their participation in the group work).

·        On readings from Olaudah Equiano

·        On readings by Frederick Douglass

·        For reading on Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        On folktale readings: “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris, “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston, “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        On reading “A Raisin in the Sun”

 

 

 

In Class Assignments: Various in-class assignments will be given to the students throughout the unit study. Most of the in class assignments should be turned in the same day, but some of the assignments (if not finished during class time) will be given as homework. These in-class assignments allow the students to ask questions as they are working, and it also allows them to work with concepts immediately after they have been taught; this will help to ensure the students’ comprehension of the material.  Also, the in-class assignments bring variety into the classroom. It’s important to integrate various projects and activities in the same lesson, so that students stay focused and motivated. 

·        Affix worksheet

·        Word deconstruction worksheet

·        Third-person Frederick Douglass reflection writing

·        Article homework assignment

·        Three-level guide

·        Cinquain poems

·        Vocabulary Scavenger Hunt

 

Homework/Assignments: Most of these homework assignments are based on writing practices, which integrate various narrative perspectives and genres. The homework assignments vary greatly in difficulty; some are as simple as poem and song writing, while others require research, analyzing and synthesis. It’s important to make sure that the students are given a wide variety of assignments because students’ learn in very different ways. In this unit, students will be exposed to plethora of writing strategies and activities at various levels of difficulty.

·        Middle Passage First-person narration assignment

·        Frederick Douglass found poem

·        Third-person omniscient point of view poem

·        Five word definition sheets

·        “Value of Reading” grade sheet

·        Song lyric writing

·        Answers to Unit Questions

·        Reflective speech paper

·        Folktale stories

·        Second-person perspective homework assignment

·        Multiple perspectives homework assignment

·        TV—BIO assignment

 

Journal Reflections: Throughout the unit, students will be asked to write journal reflections that will focus on specific concepts, readings and ideas. The reflections give the students a chance to write informally, and to use their natural voice. Also with reflections, students will be able to assess their own knowledge of the content material.

·        Summary on thoughts about the Middle Passage

·        Summary of Frederick Douglass readings

·        Reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

·        One-page self-reflective journal entry on the “I have a Dream” speech

·        “Raisin in the Sun” Reflection

 

 

Explanation of Assessments

 

 

Unit Portfolio  (Comprehensive/Lesson 14)

The students will be given a portfolio assignment that will assess their progression of work throughout the unit study. The portfolio will include all original assignments, any revisions, and self-reflections of their work. This portfolio will allow the teacher to make sure that all students have completed all the writing assignments, and it will serve as a good model for showcasing their work.

(All pieces should be neatly organized in a three-ringed binder):

·        A cover page with name, class, date, etc.

·        A table of contents

·        Grade log

·        A reflection paper that should identify, individually, what they have learned from the unit’s readings, writing assignments, and discussions. (1-2 pages)

·        A personal reflection about their goals and aspirations for the future, and how they plan to achieve these goals. Also, the students should state how determination and perseverance will help them to achieve these goals.

·        Any revision statements along with revisions and original pieces

 

 

Speech Research Presentation (Lessons 6 & 10)

 

Purpose: For this assignment, the students will be asked to think about how speakers use narration, story telling, personal feelings and experiences to persuade an audience. They will be asked to find a persuasive article, read it, research other information about he issue, and form their own opinion about the topic. After this, they will be asked to write and present a persuasive speech about the issue. This assignment will assess the students’ knowledge of narration, perspectives and narrative purposes. Also, this assignment will allow them to display their comprehension of selected research readings.

 

 

 

“Value of Reading Collage” (Lessons 2 & 7)

For this project, the students will create a poster-board collage that has pictures, texts, and magazine cutouts that display the different things that they read on a daily basis. It should also express the value of reading in their lives. Along with their poster-board, the students will turn in a paper that answers questions like: “What value does reading have in my life?”, “How did Frederick Douglass value reading?” “Why?”, “ How will reading help my success?”, “How did reading help Frederick Douglass’ success?”, “What role does reading play in my life?”. This collage, and reflection paper will assess the students on an affective level, rather than cognitive. It’s often hard to assess affective learning, but this project will force the students to recognize the significance of reading in their lives, and to identify the role that literacy played in Frederick Douglass’ success.

 

Summative Final Exam (Lesson 15)

This exam will assess the students’ understanding of the unit material and their abilities to apply various narrative perspectives to different genres. The exam will use multiple choice, true/false, interpretive and essay questions, in order to assess the students’ comprehension of the unit study. The exam will go farther than simple recall and memorization; the students will be asked to apply, create, evaluate, compare, develop, and recognize various concepts, genres and narratives covered in the unit.

 

Formal Assessments

 

 

·       Speech Research Presentation: Lessons 6 & 10

 

·       Value of Reading Collage: Lessons 2 & 7

 

·       Unit Portfolio: Lesson 14 (Comprehensive)

 

·        Unit Exam: Lesson 15 (Summative)

 

 

 

 

List of Texts

 

Autobiographies/Narratives:

·        Chapter II from The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

·        Chapter IIV from The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

 

Poems:

·        “Douglass” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

·        “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden

·        “A Dream Deferred” (A Raisin in the Sun) by Langston Hughes

·        “Equality” by Therese Howard

·        “Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes

·        “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou

 

Speeches:

·        “I Have a Dream” by Martin Luther King Jr.

·        “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention” by Sojourner Truth

 

Song Verse/Rap:

·        “Nobody Knows” by Nelly

 

Folklore/Short Stories:

·        “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris

·        “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

 

Drama:

·        “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry

 

Biography:

·        Short biography of Maya Angelou

 

“Douglass”

by Paul Laurence Dunbar

(1903)

 

Ah, Douglass, we have fall’n on evil days,

Such days as thou, not even though didst know,

When thee, the eyes of that harsh long ago

Saw. Salient, at the cross of devious ways,

And all the country heard thee with amaze.

Not ended then, the passionate ebb and flow,

The awful tide that battled to and fro;

We ride amid the tempest of dispraise.

 

Now, when the waves of swift dissension swarm,

And Honor, the strong pilot, lieth stark,

Oh, for thy voice high-sounding o’er the storm,

For thy strong arm to guide the shivering bark,

The blast-defying power of thy form,

To give us comfort through the lonely dark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Frederick Douglass”

By Robert Hayden

(1962)

 

When it is finally ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful

and terrible thing, needful to man as air,

usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all,

when it is truly instinct, brain matter, diastole, systole,

reflex action; when it is finally won; when it is more

than the gaudy mumbo jumbo of politicians:

this man, this Douglass, this former slave, this Negro

beaten to his knees, exiled, visioning a world

where none is lonely,

none hunted, alien,

this man, superb in love and logic, this man

shall be remembered. Oh, not with statues’ rhetoric,

but with the lives grown out of his life,

the lives fleshing his dream of the beautiful, needful thing.

 

 

 

 

Artist: Nelly
Album: Suit (2004)
Song: "Nobody Knows"
(feat. Anthony Hamilton)

[Anthony Hamilton]
IIIIIIIII didn't know, there'd be troubles along the way
Nobody told me nothin, nobody told me nothin, nothin
Well, well, ohh, ohhhh, ohhhhhh, oahh-ohhhh
Well, ay-heyyy, ay-hey, we-ell
Uh-huh, uh-huh-huh, uh-huh-huh, uh-huh-huh

[Nelly]
I went through, 8 different schools in, 12 different years
That's 30 different teachers, over ten thousand different peers
And I done fought in e'ryone, been suspended e'rytime
Besides a few a felony, done committed e'ry crime
But never braggin on, just want you to see me what I done done
I'm never proud of it, so I don't have to go back there again
And uhh, I used to go like house to house (man)
Sleepin on couch to couch (you know)
Walk around stickin out my hands, lookin for a handout
Only thing I handed out was more bills
Only thing pulled me out was my will
God told me the sun don't chill
Determined to make use of one of these skills
Either that or go beat the block
Ain't no way you can beat the cops
Ain't no way I can beat the clock
Just a matter of time shut down your shop
Ohh, you stay up day and nights, livin this way of life
I was +Young and Restless+
+All My Children+ came and then I had a +Guiding Light+ (hey)
No more of that sittin mayne (c'mon) sittin and waitin
and thinkin somebody comin to take me up off them streets
But now I know..

[Chorus - Anthony Hamilton]
Nobody told me that the road would be easy, yeah
I don't believe, I've made it this far
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
Nobody told me that the road would be easy (Whoaaaaaa, that the road)
I can't believe, I've made it this far (Whoo, yeahhh)
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
I can tell you right now, I'm sayin
I could sit here and count on one hand
How many people seen me graduate
I know a few that did but a bunch that ain't (hey)
Same folks showin up in swarms, waitin for me to go on
Wantin to see Ali perform, wasn't so po' before
I became this household name
I was playin them Little League games
Nobody curred if I go 0-for-3
Nobody out hurr rootin for me but my Momma
Supported me in e'rything, "Why she get e'rything?"
Some people got the nerve to ask
Y'all can kiss my ass, and that's my Momma
Got a sister that need my help (hey) and I gave peace all with wealth
Give anything that I have, just to see her in perfect health
Now we out hurr complainin, "I got work to do" (ohh)
How bad you think you got it, somebody else got it worse than you (hey)
I done had them down and ups and, don't plan on comin back down (no)
Don't plan on leavin hurr no time soon, but I got too comfortable now
Wouldn't have no knowledge of wealth, without no knowledge of self
And I'ma keep walkin this road - my mind, body and soul
I know [echoes]

[Chorus]

[Anthony Hamilton]
I didn't knowwwww
There'd be troubles along the way (I didn't know there'd be troubles)
Nobody told me nothin (nobody told me nothin)
That would help me to ease my pain (to help ease my pain, yeah)
I've been walkin this roooooad, for forever and a day (forever and a day)
Now I've been searchin somethin (whoa-ohhh)
For someone to help me find my way (somebody help me, find my way)
And now I know

 

 

 

 

 

EQUALITY

By Therese Howard

(2002)

 

You declare you see me dimly

Through a glass which will not shine

Thought I stand before you boldly

Trim in rank and marking time

 

You do own to hear me faintly

As a whisper out of range,

While my drums beat out the message

And the rhythms never change.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

You announce my ways are wanton,

That fly from man to man,

But if I’m just a shadow to you,

Could you ever understand?

 

We have lived a painful; history,

We know the shameful past,

But I keep on marching forward,

And you keep on coming last.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

Take the blinders from your vision,

Take the padding from your ears,

and confess you’ve heard me crying,

And admit you’ve seen my tears.

 

Hear the tempo so compelling,

hear the blood throb in my veins,

Yes, my drums beat nightly,

And the rhythms never change.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

 

 

 

 

“A Dream Deferred”( A Raisin in the Sun)

By Langston Hughes

 

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up

like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore—

And then run?

Does it stink like rotten meat?

Or crust and sugar over—

Like a syrupy sweet?

 

Maybe it just sags

Like a heavy load

 

Or does it explode?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Mother to Son”

By Langston Hughes

 

Well, son, I’ll tell you:

Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

It had tacks on it,

And splinters,

And boards torn up,

And places with no carpet on the floor—

Bare.

But all the time

I’se been a-climbin’ on,

And reachin’ landin’s,

And turnin’ corners,

And sometimes goin’ in the dark

Where there ain’t been no light.

So, boy, don’t you turn back.

Don’t you set down on those steps

‘Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.

Don’t you fall now—

For I’se still goin honey,

I’se still climbin’,

And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Still I Rise”

By Maya Angelou

 

You may right me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt,

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sassiness upset you?

Why are you beset with gloom?

‘Cause I’ll walk like I’ve got oil wells

Pumping in my living room.

 

Just like moons and like suns,

With the certainty of tides,

Just like hope springing high,

Still I’ll rise.

 

Did you want to see me broken?

Bowed head and lowered eyes?

Shoulders falling down like teardrops,

Weakened by me soulful cries.

 

Does my haughtiness offend you?

Don’t you take it awful hard

‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines

Diggin’ in my own back yard.

 

You may shoot me with your words,

You may cut me with your eyes,

You may kill me with your hatefulness,

But still, like air, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sexiness upset you?

Does it come as a surprise

That I dance like I’ve got diamonds

At the meeting of my thighs?

 

Out of the huts of history’s shame

I rise

Up from a past that’s rooted in pain

I rise

I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,

Welling and swelling, I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

I rise

Into a daybreak that’s wounderously clear

I rise

Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,

I am the dream and the hope of a slave.

I rise

I rise

I rise.

 

 

 

Overview of Week 1

Standards Addressed

NCTE/IRA: 1; 3; 5; 7; 9; 11

MDE: 1.1; 1.2; 1.3; 1.4; 1.5; 2.1; 3.3; 3.6; 5.3; 11.2; 11.3

 

Read

 

·        Narratives/Autobiographies: Chapter II from The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano, Chapter IIV of The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass

·        Poems: “Douglass” by Paul Laurence Dunbar, and “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden

Concepts/Input

 

·        Introduce the class to the new unit study

·        Discuss various types of narration and biographies

·        Discuss Middle Passage

·        Introduce First-person Narration

·        Introduce Frederick Douglass and give a brief overview of his life and his success

·        Discuss key concepts of Douglass’ achievements in reading.

·        Students will create a “Value of Reading Collage” related to the Douglass reading.

·        Introduce the students to suffixes and prefixes

·        Go over some word deconstruction techniques

·        Introduce concepts of third-person narration

 

Student Assignments

 

Group Assignment Sheets:

·        On readings from Olaudah Equiano

·        On readings by Frederick Douglass

In Class Assignments:

·        Affix worksheet

·        Word deconstruction worksheet

·        Third-person Frederick Douglass reflection writing

Homework/Assignments:

·        Middle Passage First-person narration assignment

·        Frederick Douglass found poem

Journal Reflections:

·        Summary on thoughts about the Middle Passage

·        Summary of Frederick Douglass readings

Lesson #1

 

Unit Title: Facing Challenges—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 1/Day: 1/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Narration”

 

Lesson Goals: Students will become familiar with the current unit: the concept of narration; genre studies in African American Literature; unit requirements; and unit descriptions. 

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify various types of story-telling approaches associated with first-person narration: protagonist, observer, and re-teller.

·        Students will be able to distinguish between autobiographies and biographies.

·        Students will be able to analyze a personal story about the Middle Passage, in first person narration, and develop their own account of the event in an autobiographical form.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will introduce the class to the new unit study, and go over the class notes about the various types of narration and biographies, then there will be a group discussion about the reading from Olaudah Equiano. Finally, the teacher will explain the assignment direction sheet details for the Middle Passage First-person narration assignment.

 

Assessment: The students will be asked to write a reflection summary on their thoughts about the Middle Passage in order to assess their comprehension of the direct instruction and reading. Also, the students should write a summary that describes the various first-person narrative perspectives in order to display their ability to identify the various aspects of first-person narration.

 

Preparation: The teacher should have previously: introduced the class to the event referred to as the Middle Passage; made the fill-in-the-blank note sheets; made group discussion sheets; made grade logs; and made direction sheets for the first assignment. The students should have read Chapter 2 of The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano in preparation for group discussion.

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Introduce the unit study and requirements. The unit will focus on: various genres of African American Literature e.g., short stories, biographies, autobiographies, drama, poems, rap, folklore, speeches; reading comprehension and word construction; writing skills and strategies; and will integrate the theme of determination. Tell the students that they will be required to keep a grade log for all assignments in this unit and a binder with all unit assignments and note sheets. Hand out grade log and explain. (10 Minutes)

·        Give students an overview of the purpose for this unit study: to recognize and the struggles and discrimination that many African Americans have endured; to appreciate the concept of determination and perseverance; to understand variations and attributes of different genres; to become familiar with the different types of narration and narrative purposes; to improve reading and writing skills. (5 minutes)

·         Go over the Narration fill-in-the-blank notes and explain the different narrative approaches. (15 minutes)

·        Have students form groups of three and four, then discuss and identify key sentences in the reading that describe the Middle Passage. Give each group worksheets that must be turned in at the end of class (every student must turn in a group worksheet with the names of all group members). (15 minutes)

·        Give students the first assignment direction sheet, explain the details of the assignment, and answer any student questions. (5minutes)

 

Conclusion:

Remind the students to turn in their group worksheets. Assign and hand out copies of the reading for the next day: The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, Chapter VII. Tell the students to write two reflection pieces in their journals: a reflection summary on their thoughts about the Middle Passage, and a summary that describes the various first-person narrative perspectives. Also, tell the students that they need to bring in magazines and poster board for a collage.

 

NARRATION

Part I: FIRST-PERSON                                      

In Class Fill-in-the-blanks notes

 

There are three basic approaches to narration that authors use when telling a story: _____(First)_________  ___(person)_______,  _____(Second)_________ _____(person)_________, and ______(Third)________  ______(person)________ .

                                                        

First-Person Narration uses the ___(“I”)____. The “I” can be the main character, an observer, or someone re-telling the story. This type of narration is used to explicitly display the narrator’s _____(feelings)_________, ______(thoughts)_________, and ____(emotions)______; the events center around these attributes of the narrator.

 

First-Person narration can be broken down into three subcategories:

First-Person _____(Protagonist)______

     In this type of narration, the “I” is the _____(main)_____  ______(character)________ telling the story.

 

EX: I couldn’t believe my dog got out of the yard; I thought the gate was locked. I was so scared that I went and drove around until I found him. When I finally found him, I was so relieved. Next time I’ll make sure the gate is locked.

 

 

First-Person _____(Witness)_________

     This type of narration integrates the _____(observation)_____ of ___(other)___  _____(people)_____ (he/she) with the  “I” personal opinion included.

 

EX: I couldn’t believe my dog got out of the yard; I thought the gate was locked. When I finally found him, he was so excited to see me, he jumped around and wagged his tail; he couldn’t wait to get back home.

 

 First-Person _____(Re-teller)_____

     In this type of narration, the story is from someone who was ____(not)___ _____(present)______ during the event, but they are giving their own personal ______(rendition)______  or  ______(account)_____ of the story.

 

EX: I can’t believe the meter –man left the gate open; he didn’t know that I have a dog because my dog was inside, but my dog has a doggy door that he can go through whenever he wants. He didn’t man to leave the gate open. In fact, he actually thought that it was closed, but when I came home it was open, and my dog was gone.

 

AUTOBIOGRAPHY: An autobiography is the biography, or story of that person’s life events, told form that person’s point of view. (Just like Equiano)

 

BIOGRAPHY: A biography is a description of someone’s life or experiences told from someone else’s point of view.

 

 

 

 

 

Middle Passage First-person Protagonist Assignment Direction Sheet

 

Assignment Description: For this assignment, I would like you to research and read more about the Middle Passage, and then re-tell the story, in first-person protagonist narration, as if you were the person who endured the hardships of the Middle passage.

 

Purpose: For this assignment I want you to recognize some of the key concepts that are related to the Middle passage, so that you may better understand the struggles and hardships that many of these slaves endured. Also, I want you to engage your comprehension narration by applying you knowledge of first-person protagonist narration to your own original story—constructed from descriptions provided by other resources.

 

Directions:

1.      Find at least two different resources that describe the Middle Passage.

2.      Highlight some key sentences in the descriptive pieces, and type them one a separate piece of paper that will be handed in with your paper.

3.      Make up your own character. Pretend that you are a slave who has endured the Middle Passage (like Equiano); tell us your experience using first-person protagonist narration. Treat it as though you are writing an autobiographical account of the event.

4.      Use the key sentences to help you describe the passage, but make sure they are in your won words.

5.      Write a reference page.

You paper should:

·                    Include title page with your name, paper title, and date.

·                    Be at least two pages long (typed, 12pt. font, double-spaced)

·                    Be in first-person protagonist narration—autobiographical form

·                    Have a sentence page with the key descriptive sentences you highlighted

·                    Have a reference page with the works that you used

 

 

This paper is due Four days from today’s date!

              !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet

 

For Reading on Olaudah Equiano, Chapter 2

 

Group Member Names:________________________________________________

 

Directions: These questions should be answered as a group, during group discussion, but every individual must turn in a copy with the names of all group members. Everyone should turn one of these sheets in. turn in this sheet, with the group answers AT THE END OF THE HOUR! Write on the back if you need more room.

 

1.      Highlight some key sentences in the reading that describe the Middle Passage and write them down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.      How do his emotions in these sentences help to describe the Middle Passage?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3.      Does his personal account of the Middle Passage help the description? Or do you think it would be the same if he was just telling the story, but had never actually experienced it? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4.      How do personal experiences help to describe different attributes of a story?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STUDENT NAME:_________________________                        CLASS:HOUR:______

 

UNIT: Narrative Perspectives—Determination

Genre Studies in African American Literature GRADE LOG

 

Assignment

Date:

Grade

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #2

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 1/Day: 2/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “The need to read”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able identify and map the importance and value of reading in their own lives by creating a reading value collage.

·        Students will demonstrate their reading capabilities by reading the text out loud.

·        Students will be able to locate key words that represent the reading, and write a found poem.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will introduce Frederick Douglass and give a brief overview of his life and his success, and then the students will take turns reading selected sections of Chapter IIV of The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass out loud. After the students have read the text out loud, the teacher will discuss key concepts of Douglass’ achievements in reading. The teacher will then tell the students about found poems and have them write one. Lastly, the students will be given directions for their reading-value collages, and will begin working on them.

 

Assessment: Teacher will lead a class discussion to engage the students’ interest in reading, and also to allow the students to reflect on the value of literacy in their own lives—discussion topics listed in input portion. The students will be asked to write a reflection summary on their impressions of Frederick Douglass in order to assess their comprehension of the reading material.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should: bring an overhead of an example found poem; be familiar with the accomplishments of Frederick Douglass; bring copies of the reading-value collage direction sheet. The students should have read the assigned reading for the day, and should have also brought in magazines to cut up, and a poster-board to use for their collages.

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Give the students a brief overview and summary of Douglass’ life and his accomplishments, explain in further detail: that he was a slave until 1838; he became an accomplished writer and speaker; he is one of the most predominant American abolitionists; and he helped to rally men to fight in the Civil War; and that he attributes all of his success to his literacy. (10 minutes)

·        Then the students will take turns reading a portion of Chapter IIV (the part where he discusses his achievement in learning to read and write). (10 minutes)

·        Next, the teacher will have a class discussion about the material that was just read. Ask questions like:

--“Why didn’t Mr. Auld want Douglass to learn how to read and write?”

--“Why did Douglass feel it was so important to learn to read and write?”

--“Do you value reading as much as he did? “Would you have endured the same struggles in order to learn?” “Why or why not?”

--“Do you feel just as fortunate to be able to read and write?”

--“Do you take your literacy for granted?” “How”

--“Do you use your reading abilities in everyday life?” “How?”

(15 minutes)

·        The teacher will then tell the students what a found poem consists of, and hand out a description sheet. After the teacher has described a found poem, he/she will put up the example from a transparency, and will read the found poem example out loud. The students will write their own found poem as a homework assignment. (10 minutes)

·        The students will then be given the direction sheet for the reading-value collage, and will begin working on them in class. (15 minutes)

 

Conclusion: The teacher should tell the students to find five words in the reading from today that they don’t know the definitions of. Remind the students that their found poems are due tomorrow, and that they should write a reflection summary on their impressions of Frederick Douglass.

 

Frederick Douglass

 

American Slave

 Torment me

New train of thought

Teach

 A, B, C

Understand

Hope of being free

Learn how to read

Moved in every storm

Pathway to freedom

Took place between them

At whatever cost or trouble

Behold!

Silver trump of freedom

Learn how to read

Inspire

With a desire

Determination to learn

New sight

No other light

I succeeded

Learning to read and write

No regular teacher

Hope of being free

Abolishing

Denunciation

Emancipation

Learning how to read

Enabled me

Powerful

Vindication of human rights

Object within sight

Valuable

Bread of knowledge

Smiled in every calm

Breathed in every wind

Learning how to read and write…

 

Found Poem by Grace Fisher

 

 

Found Poem Direction Sheet

 

 

A found poem is a poem that is made up of words and phrases found in a text that represent the concepts identified in a reading.

 

Directions:

 

1.      Go through the reading from today (Frederick Douglass), and circle words or phrases that you feel represent the text as a whole, or that convey the emotions and feelings of Frederick Douglass.

2.      Put the words and phrases into a special order that you feel expresses Frederick Douglass’ point of view.

3.      Title the poem “Frederick Douglass”

4.      This poem should be typed.

5.      Don’t forget to add your name!

6.      The found poem is DUE TOMORROW!

 

“The Value of Reading” Collage Direction Sheet

In class we’ve been discussing the value of reading, and the determination for literacy that Frederick Douglass had. Douglass felt that his literacy helped him to become a successful writer and abolitionist. I want you to ask yourself the following questions:

·        “What value does reading have in my life?”

·        “How did Frederick Douglass value reading?” “Why?”

·        “How will reading help my success?”

·        “How did reading help Frederick Douglass’ success?”

·        “What role does reading play in my life?”

 

After you have thought about these questions, I would like you to make a collage that represents the value of reading in your life.

 

The final project should be a poster-board collage that has pictures, texts, and magazine cutouts that display the different things that you read on a daily basis. It should also express the value of reading in your life. The collage should have your name, the project name, and a title. Along with your poster-board, you need to turn in your typed up answers to the questions above.

 

You will be given class time to work on your collages, but you are responsible for any extra time that you need to complete the project.

 

 

The project will be due one week from today!

 

 

 

 

Lesson #3

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 1/Day: 3/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Affixes are a word’s best friend”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to recognize the significance of affixes in relation to simple and complex words.

·        Students will be able to identify the meanings of affixes in relation to word construction by distinguishing between prefixes and suffixes through definition research.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will introduce the students to suffixes and prefixes. The students will then be given an affix sheet to work on in class. After that, the teacher will go over some word deconstruction techniques.

 

Assessment: The teacher will observe the students as they read their found poems to make sure that they are able to identify key words in the readings and form found poems. Also, the students will have to complete and in class affix worksheet in order to assure their abilities to identify definitions and uses of suffixes and prefixes.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared Four handouts: the in class notes, the affix work sheet, the word, deconstruction worksheet, and the word deconstruction homework sheet. The students should have brought their found poems to turn in.

 

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Ask students if they would like to volunteer reading their found poems, and ask them why they chose some of the words in their poems. Then the teacher will collect everyone’s poems. (15 minutes)

·        Go over the Affix Fill-in-the-blank note sheets.

(10 minutes)

·        After the students have been introduced to affixes, they will be asked to complete the in-class worksheet that will be due at the end of class. (15 minutes)

·        If the students are finished with the affixation work sheet, then they can use the rest of class time to work on their collages.

 

Conclusion: The teacher should remind the students should have circled five words in the Frederick Douglass piece and/or poems that they were unfamiliar with for tomorrow’s class. Also, the teacher should hand out the two poems that the students should read in preparation for tomorrow’s class.

 

 

Affixation Fill-in-the-blank note sheet

 

 

1.      ____(Affixation)____ is identified as the process of adding suffixes and prefixes to a word.

2.      _____(Affixes)_____ can be classified as _____(prefixes)_____,  ______(infixes)______, and ______(suffixes)______.

3.      A _____(prefix)_____ is added to the ____(beginning)____ of a word.

EX: Unpredictable— “un-“ is the prefix for the word.

 

4.      A ____(suffix)____ is added to the end of a word.

EX: Unpredictable— “-able” is the suffix for the word.

 

5.      Affixes must always be added to a ___(root)___  ____(word____.

EX: Unpredictable— The word “predict” is the root word.

 

Every affix has its own meaning, and often changes the classification of a word.

EX: Predict is a verb, but if we add the suffix –able it changes the word to “predictable”, which is an adjective. (V—A)

EX: If we add another suffix “-(il)ity” to the word “predictable”, then it turns into the word “predictability”, which is a noun. (V—A—N)

 

 

Name:____________________             Date:_______________     Class Hour:_____

 

Affix Definition In-Class Work Sheet

For the Following list of affixes:  -State whether it is a suffix or a prefix

-Look in a dictionary and find the definitions/meanings of the affixes

 

 

Write the number next to each answer

 

list of affixes

Definition

Example word that uses the Affix

1.      –itis

2.      se-/sed-

3.      meta-

4.      ab-/abs

5.      ecto-

6.      endo-

7.      intra-

8.      –ary/

      -ory

 

 

9.      –ous

10.  epi-

 

 

 

 

 

“Douglass”

by Paul Laurence Dunbar

(1903)

 

Ah, Douglass, we have fall’n on evil days,

Such days as thou, not even though didst know,

When thee, the eyes of that harsh long ago

Saw. Salient, at the cross of devious ways,

And all the country heard thee with amaze.

Not ended then, the passionate ebb and flow,

The awful tide that battled to and fro;

We ride amid the tempest of dispraise.

 

Now, when the waves of swift dissension swarm,

And Honor, the strong pilot, lieth stark,

Oh, for thy voice high-sounding o’er the storm,

For thy strong arm to guide the shivering bark,

The blast-defying power of thy form,

To give us comfort through the lonely dark.

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Frederick Douglass”

By Robert Hayden

(1962)

 

When it is finally ours, this freedom, this liberty, this beautiful

and terrible thing, needful to man as air,

usable as earth; when it belongs at last to all,

when it is truly instinct, brain matter, diastole, systole,

reflex action; when it is finally won; when it is more

than the gaudy mumbo jumbo of politicians:

this man, this Douglass, this former slave, this Negro

beaten to his knees, exiled, visioning a world

where none is lonely,

none hunted, alien,

this man, superb in love and logic, this man

shall be remembered. Oh, not with statues’ rhetoric,

but with the lives grown out of his life,

the lives fleshing his dream of the beautiful, needful thing.

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #4

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 1/Day: 4/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Deconstructing Douglass”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to deconstruct unfamiliar words by breaking apart various words through close analysis with justification for their speculative responses by providing written examples of other words that contain the same word parts.

·        Students will be able to hypothesize meanings of unfamiliar words by using word deconstruction techniques and through sentence clues.

·        Students will be able to interpret the meanings of poems through group collaboration and stanza analysis (compare/contrast).  

 

Activities: Today the teacher will hand out the word deconstruction direction sheet, and the students will do an in-class assignment relating to it. Then the teacher will hand out the word definition homework sheet. Next, the teacher will have the students read the two poems about Frederick Douglass aloud, and then they will form small groups and answers some questions about the poems’ meanings.

 

Assessment: The students will complete the word deconstruction sheet in class to make sure that they are able to apply the techniques to deconstructing various words. Also, the teacher should observe group activity to make sure that all students are engaged in discussion and are able to interpret the narrative purposes of the poems.

 

 

 

Preparation: The teacher should have previously prepared three handouts in preparation for today’s class: the word deconstruction sheet, the homework sheets, and the group answer sheet. Also, the students should have read the two assigned poems, and should have circled five words in the Frederick Douglass readings that they were unfamiliar with.

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Hand out, and review the in class word deconstruction sheet.

(10 minutes)

·        Have the students complete the worksheet. (10 minutes)

·        Explain and handout the word definition homework sheet.                     (5 minutes)

·        Ask for volunteers to read the two poems aloud. (5 minutes)

·        Students should then form small groups and discuss and answer the group worksheets. (20 minutes)

 

Conclusion: Remind the students that their first-person protagonist Middle Passage story is due tomorrow, and their word definition sheets are due in two days. Also, tell them to hand in their group sheets and word deconstruction in class sheets before they leave class today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In-Class Word Deconstruction Worksheet                                                      

 

Name:________________           Date:______________          Class Hour:____

 

This worksheet will not be graded on correct answers, but rather homework points will be given for successful completion and effort. This worksheet must be turned in at the end of class.

 

Directions: To the best of your ability/ on a separate sheet of paper write down each word on the list, and

1.      Try to break down each word into the smallest units that you can identify

      (use slash marks to break up the word).

2.      List the meaning (you can guess if you don’t know) of at least one part of the word.

3.      Try and come up with another word that uses the same part of that word, or a word that uses that similar part

(Remember: they don’t have to be exactly the same, just similar).

4.      Try to determine the definitions of: that example word, the words part you used, and the original word (compare/contrast).

 

EX: Discontinuation = Dis/continu/(at)ion

 

1.      Dis/                              continue                                    /(at)ion

 

 


2. apart/reverse         to persist/to go on                  creates action (verb) 

 

3. Continue         Continuum: 

 

4. Continuum:  Noun (it may help to state what kind of word it is)

It is a continuous event that can’t be individually distinguished unless it is separately divided, or it can be a set of all real numbers. Continue is a verb, and continuum is a noun. They both contain the part ‘con’, which means together, or with. They are similar because they both represent a succession or consistency of some kind, but one word is a verb and the other is a noun. Discontinuation is something that stops something from persisting.

 

(Did you noticeJ the words contain and consistency also use the morpheme ‘con’!)   

 

Words:

 

1.      Ideological

2.      Reutilization

3.      Disequilibrium

 

 

 

Name:___________________  Date:________________  Class Hour:_____________

Definition Research Worksheet

Complete one sheet for each individual word, so you should be handing in

five sheets

(Use the back if necessary)

 

WORD:

SENTENCE:

 

1. What part of speech do you think this word belongs to? Why? (What sentence structure clues lead you to this determination?)

 

 

 

2. Break apart the word using word deconstruction techniques.  Do you see a root word? What affixes do you think the word contains?

 

 

 

3. If possible, place meanings to the root word and affixes. How does the process of affixation change the meaning of the word?

 

 

 

 

 

4. Put the meanings together and try to formulate a prediction about what the word might mean. Justify you answers. (What brought you to your conclusions about the word’s meaning?)

 

 

 

 

5. Look the word up in the dictionary. What is the definition that best suits this word in the sentence? Why did you choose that particular definition? Was the full word listed as a definition, or was it a definition from the variation of the root word?

 

 

 

 

6. How close was your prediction to the actual definition of the word in the sentence’s meaning? Compare and contrast your predictions and research findings. 

 

 

 

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet

 

For Reading on the poems about Frederick Douglass

 

Group Member Names:________________________________________________

 

Directions: These questions should be answered as a group, during group discussion, but every individual must turn in a copy with the names of all group members. Everyone should turn one of these sheets in. turn in this sheet, with the group answers AT THE END OF THE HOUR! Write on the back if you need more room.

 

1.      What are the main differences in these two poems?

 

 

 

 

2.      What are the similarities?

 

 

 

 

3.      Do these poems describe Frederick Douglass? If so, How?

 

 

 

 

4.      Who are the poems speaking to? Explain for each poem.

 

 

 

 

5.      When Robert Hayden says “the lives fleshing his dream of the beautiful, needful thing”, what is he referring to as “the beautiful, needful thing”?

 

 

 

 

 

6.      When Paul Laurence Dunbar says, “To give us comfort through the lonely dark”, what is he referring to as “the lonely dark”? What is he speaking about?

 

 

Lesson #5

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 1/Day: 5/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “The third-person’s perspective”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify the key attributes of third-person narration.

·        Students will be able to apply previous readings to the concept of narration and purpose.

·        Students will be able to write a reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

 

Activities: Today the class will have a discussion about the group work from the previous day. After the class discussion, the teacher will go over the in class fill-in-the-blank note sheet about third-person narration, and then the teacher should hand out the binder requirements sheet.  

 

Assessment: Teacher will engage the students in a class discussion—discussion topics listed in input portion to assess students’ abilities to: differentiate narrative perspectives in the two poems; compare/contrast purposes for narrative approaches; analyze the poems’ meanings. The students will be asked to write a reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

 

Preparation: The teacher should have previously prepared the in class note sheet about third person narration in preparation for today’s class, the binder requirement sheet, and the students should have their completed Middle passage first-person narration assignment to turn in.

Input/Modeling:

 

·        First, the teacher will collect the Middle Passage assignment.

·        Next, the teacher will lead a class discussion about the answers from the previous day’s group work. (15 minutes)

Ask questions like:

 

“What are the main differences in these two poems?”

“What are the similarities?”

“Do these poems describe Frederick Douglass? If so, How?”

“Who are the poems speaking to? How do they display this? What

            techniques do they use?”

“When Robert Hayden says “the lives fleshing his dream of the 

             beautiful, needful thing”, what is he referring to as “the beautiful,

             needful thing”?

“When Paul Laurence Dunbar says, “To give us comfort through the   

             lonely dark”, what is he referring to as “the lonely dark”? What is he

             speaking about?”   

·        The teacher will then go over the in third person narration in class note sheet. (15 minutes)

·        Then the teacher should hand out the binder requirement sheet—thus far.

·        Finally, the students will be asked to write an in-class reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third-person perspective. (20 minutes)

·        Tell the students to write a poem about Frederick Douglass from a third-person omniscient point of view that will be due the next class period.

 

Conclusion:

Remind the students that their definition worksheets and third-person poems are due the next class period. Make sure the students turn in their reflections at the end of class. Hand out the readings for the next class period: speeches by Martin King jr. “I have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

 

 

NARRATION

Part II: Third-PERSON                                      

In Class Fill-in-the-blanks notes

                                                        

Third-Person Narration mentions the ___(“he/she”)____ in a story. The narrator uses the “he/she” to tell a story about someone else. In this type of narration, the narrator is _____(rarely)_____  ____(identified); the narrator doesn’t usually identify _____(his or her)____  ____(self)______ as part of the story. The narrator’s/story-teller’s personal opinions are not identified. This type of narration often distances the writer from the events/characters of the story.

 

Third-Person narration can be broken down into three subcategories:

Third-Person _____(Omniscient)______

“Omniscient” means that they have a view as though they are everywhere at all times.

     In this type of narration, the storyteller has __(no)__  _____(limitations)_____ of knowledge about the ____(story)_____,  _____(persons)_____ or ____(events)_____; the narrator/story-teller sees all and knows all. The storyteller can convey all or some of the character’s ____(thoughts)____, _____(feelings)____, and _____(emotions)_____.

 

EX: Sally couldn’t believe that her dog had gotten out of the yard. Earlier that day, the meter-man went into the back yard and forgot to close the gate as he was leaving Actually, he thought he closed it, but as he was walking away, his shirt caught the gate latch and it came loose.

 

Third-Person _____(Objective)_________

     In this type of narration, the storyteller can only tell the reader what they (the narrator/story-teller) ____(saw)____, ____(heard)_____, or _____(observed)_____. Often, this type of writing allows the reader to construct _____(his/her)_____ own personal opinions of the character’s emotions based on the _____(events)_____ , ______(situations)______, or ______(interactions)_____ in the story.

 

EX: Sally ran out of the back yard a called out for her dog, “Skipper, Skipper…where are you Skipper”, then she frantically got in her car and drove off. A short while after, she came back with her dog.

 

 Third-Person _____(Limited)_____

     In this type of narration, the storyteller is ____(limited)____ to revealing or knowing the thoughts, feelings and emotions of only _____(one)_______  ______(character)_______.

 

EX: Sally was so distressed when she got home: her dog was nowhere to be found! She ran out and called his name, but she figured the only way she would find him was to drive around and look. She only had to drive around the block once before she saw her dog peeing in the front yard of someone else’s house; she was so embarrassed.

 

 

 

 

 

BINDER/PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS—For 1st Week

 

As you know, you are required to keep a binder for this unit with all of your assignments, readings and note sheets. This is just a reminder, so you are aware of what assignments and readings we have done so far. I want you to stay organize and to be well prepared for the binder checks at the end of this unit study. I might have not handed some of these assignments back yet, but make sure that you’ve at least handed them in; you should put them in your binder as soon as they are returned! If, for some unforeseeable reason, you have not read all the assigned readings on this list, be sure to read them because you will be tested on the information in the readings! Remember, you can revise any assignments and put the revisions in your final portfolio.

 

Readings:

·        Chapter II from The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

·        Chapter IIV from The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

·        “Douglass” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

·        “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden

In class note sheets:

·        Narration Part I: First-person

·        Affixation

·        Narration Part II: Third-person

Group Assignment Sheets:

·        On readings from Olaudah Equiano

·        On readings by Frederick Douglass

In Class Assignments:

·        Affix worksheet

·        Word deconstruction worksheet

·        Third-person Frederick Douglass reflection writing

Homework/Assignments:

·        Middle Passage First-person narration assignment

·        Frederick Douglass found poem

Journal Reflections:

·        Summary on thoughts about the Middle Passage

·        Summary of Frederick Douglass readings

·        Reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

Coming up…

·        Read speeches for next class period: Martin King jr. “I have a Dream”,

    “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        Third-person omniscient point of view poem due next class period

·        Five word definition sheets due next class period

·        “Value of Reading” collage due in two class periods

 

 

Overview of Week 2

Standards Addressed

NCTE/IRA: 1; 2; 4; 7; 9; 11

MDE: 1.1; 1.2; 1.3; 1.5; 2.1; 2.2; 3.3; 3.7; 4.1; 5.1; 6.2; 7.3; 8.2; 9.2; 10.1; 10.3; 11.2

Read

·        Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        Song: “Nobody Knows” by Nelly

·        Folktales: “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris, “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston, ”Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

Concepts/Input

·        Discuss purpose and persuasiveness in speech writing

·        Introduce third-person narrative and perspective

·        Integrate various genres and narrative perspectives

·        Introduce theme: determination

·        Develop song lyrics

·        Discuss and develop folktales

Student Assignments   

Group Assignment Sheets:

·        For reading on Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        On folktale readings: “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris, “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston, “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

In Class Assignments:

·        Article homework assignment

·        Three-level guide

·        Cinquain poems

Homework/Assignments:

·        Third-person omniscient point of view poem

·        Five word definition sheets

·        “Value of Reading” grade sheet

·        Song lyric writing

·        Answers to Unit Questions

·        Reflective speech paper

Journal Reflections:

·        One-page personal journal reflection on the “I have a Dream” speech

 

Lesson #6

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 1/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Speaking of Speeches…”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify the key attributes of persuasive speeches.

·        Students will be able to construct a persuasive speech about a topic that they will research.

·        Students will be able to explain the various ways that first-person perspective is used. (Compare/Contrast: Speech vs. Autobiography)

 

activities: Today the teacher will have the students read their poems and parts of the speech reading assignments aloud, and then they will form groups to discuss the variations between first-person perspectives. 

 

Assessment: The teacher will observe the students as they read their poems out loud to make sure they understand third-person narrative perspective. Observe students during group discussion to make sure they are all participating. Have students write a one-page personal journal reflection on the “I have a Dream” speech to check for reading comprehension. Tell the students to include the type of narrative perspective they are using; they should also say why they chose that type of narration and how it is effective for this type of reflection. 

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared the group discussion worksheet, and the speech assignment sheet. Students should have read the Assigned speech readings for today’s lesson: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth. The students should also have their assignments ready to turn in.

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Ask for volunteers to read their third-person Frederick Douglass poems. After they read their poems, ask the class what attributes help to make the poems written from a third-person perspective. Also, ask them why this is an effective way to write this type of poem. (10 minutes)

·        Read “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth aloud”. (5 minutes)

·        Break class up into groups of three and four. Groups should discuss and answers the questions on the discussion sheet. (20 minutes)

·        Hand out speech presentation research assignment and explain.             (5 minutes)

·        Tell the students to write a one page personal reflection on the “I have a Dream” speech. Tell the to include the type of narrative perspective they are using; they should also say why they chose this type of narration and how it is effective for this type of reflection. 

·        Allow students to work on collage assignments that are due the next day. (15 minutes)

 

Conclusion: Remind students that “The Value of Reading” collages and one page personal reflections are due the next day. Also, make sure that the students hand in the group worksheets before they leave class.

 

 

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet

 

For Reading on Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

 

Group Member Names:____________________________________________

 

Directions: These questions should be answered as a group, during group discussion, but every individual must turn in a copy with the names of all group members. Everyone should turn one of these sheets in. Turn in this sheet, with the group answers AT THE END OF THE HOUR! Write on the back if you need more room.

 

1.      How does Sojouner Truth use her personal feelings to persuade the listeners? 

 

 

 

 

 

2.      Why does Martin Luther King Jr. use more of a story approach to persuade the listeners?

 

 

 

 

3.      Which approach is more effective? Why?

 

 

 

 

4.      How do personal experiences, thought and feelings help to encourage or persuade the audience?

 

 

5.      What are the purposes for each speech?

 

 

6.      Who are the speakers talking to?

 

 

7.      What type of narrative perspective are they using? Why?

Speech Research Presentation Direction Sheet

Purpose: For this assignment, I want you to think about how speakers use narration, story-telling and personal feeling and experiences to persuade an audience. Think about how this type of perspective varies from the narration in autobiographies.

 

Directions:

·        Make sure you’ve read the assigned speech readings

·        Research a topic/issue and find an article about it

·        Read the article and form your own opinion about the issue

·        Write a persuasive speech that conveys not only your personal thoughts or feelings about the issue, but it must also identify the key arguments/points of the article

·        You will then present your speech (read it) to the class. Be sure to tell us who your intended audience. Your speech should be no longer than 2 minutes.

 

You should hand in:

·        A 1-2 page types, double-spaced 12pt. font copy of your speech

·        Title page that includes: your name, article name, title of your speech, and your intended audience

·        A copy of the article that you used

·        A rubric sheet with your name and speech title

·        A reflection page that should answer the following questions:

 

1.                  For what purposes do speakers use narration, story-telling, and personal feelings and experiences to persuade audiences?

2.                  What type of narration did you use in your speech?

3.                  Do you think these are effective techniques?

4.                  How does this type of narration vary from the narration in autobiographies?

5.                  Do you think this type of speech writing displays a similar perspective that is used in autobiographies? Why?

6.                 Are autobiographies meant to be persuasive? How?

 

This assignment/presentation is due in one week!

Speech Research Presentation Rubric Sheet

Student Name:______________________       Speech Title:______________

Key: 1-Very poor, 2-poor, 3-average, 4-good, 5-excellent

Points for Speech

Points earned

5pts. Possible

Skill description

 

Shows knowledge of assigned readings

 

Displays personal opinion

 

Identifies key issues of the article/Persuasive

 

Identifies intended audience and title

 

No longer than 2 minutes

 

___________=Total points out of 25

 

Points for Reflective Paper

Points earned

5pts. Possible

Descriptions for paper

 

1-2 pages long

 

Correct spelling grammar and mechanics

 

Copy of the article used

 

Answers question #1

 

Answers question #2

 

Answers question #3

 

Answers question #4

 

Answers question #5

 

Answers question #6

 

___________=Total points out of 45     Assignment total:_________/70pts.

Lesson #7

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives –Determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 2/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “How do you value reading?”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to explain the purposes of narration in persuasive speeches.

·        Students will be able to present projects that represent the value of reading in their lives.

·        Students will be able to identify the most significant uses of reading in their lives.

 

 

activities: Today the teacher will lead a class discussion about the topics from the previous day’s group discussion answers, then the students will present and explain their reading collages.

 

Assessment: The teacher will have a class discussion about the group questions from the previous day to make sure that the students understand narrative approach techniques in speeches. Also, the students will present their “Value of Reading” collages, which will assess their ability to apply the value of reading to their own lives.

 

Preparation: Students should have completed their reading collages in preparation for today’s class. Also the teacher should have prepared the article direction homework sheet handouts.

 

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Go over the questions from the previous day’s group discussion

(15 minutes)

·        Students will then individually present their “Value of Reading” collages (35 minutes)

·        Handout article homework sheet

 

Conclusion: Give the students a round of applause! Remind them that their article homework is due tomorrow!

 

 

 

Article Homework Assignment

Purpose:

For this assignment, I want you to think about how writers use third-person narrative perspectives to write newspaper articles that retell a specific event in time.

I want you to apply what you know about third-person perspectives to the art of journalism. You should be reading some articles for your other assignment, but if you haven’t yet, just look at some to see how they are written. After reading the Martin Luther King Jr. speech, you probably have some strong emotions or thoughts about the event, but for this assignment we’re just going to focus on the facts.

 

Directions:

·                    Make sure you’ve read the Martin Luther King Jr. speech!

·                    Highlight some key statements or phrases from the speech that you think represent MLK’s purpose or objective for giving the speech.

·                    Now, pretend you’re a journalist who was an audience member during the actual speech. You have to write an article for the newspaper that gives a summary of the speech.

·                    Make sure you integrate some actual quotes from the speech.

·                    Don’t use “I”, remember—this is suppose to be written from a third-person perspective.

 

Questions to think about and ask your self:

-“What was MLK’s objective for the speech?”

-“Where was it given? On what day?”

-“Who were the audience members?

-“What were their impressions?”
-“Was it motivating?”

-“Was it an effective, persuasive and/or encouraging? Why?”

-“How did he address the audience?”

 

THIS ARTICLE IS DUE TOMORROW!

 

 

Lesson #8

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 3/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “The need to succeed: determination”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to generate lists based on prior knowledge and experiences.

·        Students will be able to create a cinquain poem based on the lecture for today.

·        Students will be able to interpret lyrics to a song and differentiate between facts, opinions and beliefs.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will have the students get into groups and brainstorm, then they will read the lyrics to a song and fill out the three-level guide, and finally they will write a cinquain poem.

 

Assessment: The students will hand in the three-level guide, which assess their abilities to differentiate between facts, opinions and inferences. The teacher will lead a class discussion about the three-level guides (questions for discussion listed below). Also, the students will write cinquain poems that will assess their understanding of the cinquain poem structure; it should also express their feelings about determination.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared the following handouts: the cause/effect pattern guide handouts; the three-level guide handouts; copies of lyrics to the song; the cinquain poem sheet; and copies of the folktale readings.

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Collect article assignments that are due today.

·        Have the students get into groups of three and four and brainstorm some concepts or words that they associate with determination, and then have the students come up and write their answers on the board. After this, the teacher should have the class discuss the similarities and differences in their answers. (10 minutes)

·        Next, the teacher will hand out lyrics to the rap song “Nobody Knows” by Nelly and the three-level guide that goes along with it. As the students read the song lyrics, the teacher should play the song. (5 minutes)

·        After the students have listened to the song, they should get together in pairs and discuss and answer the three-level guide questions.

(10 minutes)

·        When the students are finished with the three level guides, the teacher should lead a class discussion about the statements on level three. Ask questions like:

 

Questions:

1. Hard work will bring results and/or success

-How many of you checked number one?

-Why, Why not

-Can things be accomplished without hard work?

-How many of you feel better about accomplishing things if you’ve worked really hard? Why?

 

 

2. Graduating high School is one of the first steps toward success

-How many of you think that success is only possible if you graduate high school?

-Okay, so why do you think so much emphasis is put on graduating?

-How many of you will feel good about graduating? Why?

3. When the road gets tough try, try again

-Why do you think this statement is so popular?

-Can anyone apply this statement to a struggle in his or her own life?

-Do you wish you had given up? Why?

4. Hard work is its own reward

-Has anyone ever really worked hard at something, but failed?

-What did you fail at?

-Do you think you could have done more?

-Did it help that you knew you tried your best?

-Would you have worked as hard as you did, even if you knew you were going to fail?

So maybe we don’t always get what we want, but if we know that we’ve worked as hard as we could, and then it becomes a personal reward, and gives us peace about the situation.  

5. Anyone can succeed as long as they are determined

-So how does that last statement compare to the next one?

-Does determination come from within ourselves, or should we expect to get it from someone else.

-Think about struggles in your own life, sometimes they seem bad, but as Nelly said…”How bad you think you got it, somebody’s got it worse than you. What do you think about this statement?

Do you think people forget this? Do you think it’s better to say something’s too hard, and just forget about it. Why do you think determination and hard work are so important?

(15 minutes)

·        Finally, hand out the cinquain poem sheet: students should write their own poem during class.

·        Hand out the Cause/Effect Pattern guide for homework

·        Hand out the song creation sheet for homework

Conclusion: Remind students that both homework assignments from today are due tomorrow. Also, make sure students hand in their cinquain poems and three-level guides before they leave class. Hand out folktale readings and tell the students to read them for tomorrow’s class.

 

 

Artist: Nelly
Album: Suit
Song: "Nobody Knows"
(feat. Anthony Hamilton)

[Anthony Hamilton]
IIIIIIIII didn't know, there'd be troubles along the way
Nobody told me nothin, nobody told me nothin, nothin
Well, well, ohh, ohhhh, ohhhhhh, oahh-ohhhh
Well, ay-heyyy, ay-hey, we-ell
Uh-huh, uh-huh-huh, uh-huh-huh, uh-huh-huh

[Nelly]
I went through, 8 different schools in, 12 different years
That's 30 different teachers, over ten thousand different peers
And I done fought in e'ryone, been suspended e'rytime
Besides a few a felony, done committed e'ry crime
But never braggin on, just want you to see me what I done done
I'm never proud of it, so I don't have to go back there again
And uhh, I used to go like house to house (man)
Sleepin on couch to couch (you know)
Walk around stickin out my hands, lookin for a handout
Only thing I handed out was more bills
Only thing pulled me out was my will
God told me the sun don't chill
Determined to make use of one of these skills
Either that or go beat the block
Ain't no way you can beat the cops
Ain't no way I can beat the clock
Just a matter of time shut down your shop
Ohh, you stay up day and nights, livin this way of life
I was +Young and Restless+
+All My Children+ came and then I had a +Guiding Light+ (hey)
No more of that sittin mayne (c'mon) sittin and waitin
and thinkin somebody comin to take me up off them streets
But now I know..

[Chorus - Anthony Hamilton]
Nobody told me that the road would be easy, yeah
I don't believe, I've made it this far
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
Nobody told me that the road would be easy (Whoaaaaaa, that the road)
I can't believe, I've made it this far (Whoo, yeahhh)
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
I can tell you right now, I'm sayin
I could sit here and count on one hand
How many people seen me graduate
I know a few that did but a bunch that ain't (hey)
Same folks showin up in swarms, waitin for me to go on
Wantin to see Ali perform, wasn't so po' before
I became this household name
I was playin them Little League games
Nobody curred if I go 0-for-3
Nobody out hurr rootin for me but my Momma
Supported me in e'rything, "Why she get e'rything?"
Some people got the nerve to ask
Y'all can kiss my ass, and that's my Momma
Got a sister that need my help (hey) and I gave peace all with wealth
Give anything that I have, just to see her in perfect health
Now we out hurr complainin, "I got work to do" (ohh)
How bad you think you got it, somebody else got it worse than you (hey)
I done had them down and ups and, don't plan on comin back down (no)
Don't plan on leavin hurr no time soon, but I got too comfortable now
Wouldn't have no knowledge of wealth, without no knowledge of self
And I'ma keep walkin this road - my mind, body and soul
I know [echoes]

[Chorus]

[Anthony Hamilton]
I didn't knowwwww
There'd be troubles along the way (I didn't know there'd be troubles)
Nobody told me nothin (nobody told me nothin)
That would help me to ease my pain (to help ease my pain, yeah)
I've been walkin this roooooad, for forever and a day (forever and a day)
Now I've been searchin somethin (whoa-ohhh)
For someone to help me find my way (somebody help me, find my way)
And now I know

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name:_____________________________                      Class Hour:______________

“Nobody Knows” by Nelly 3-Level guide

Level I

Directions: Put an X next to the statement that can be supported by the song’s lyrics.

 

____1. Nelly went to school in the inner city

 

____2. Nelly never graduated High School

 

____3. C’s get degrees

 

____4. Life isn’t always that hard

 

____5. Determination is the only thing that will help you graduate

Level II

Directions: Put an X next to the statement that can be supported based on facts in the song’s lyrics.

 

____1. Crime leads to time

 

____2. Graduating high School is one of the first steps toward success

 

____3. Graduating High School didn’t help Nelly’s success

 

____4. Living the “playa” life helped Nelly’s success

 

____5. Being afraid of failure will bring success

Level III

Directions: Put an X next to the statements that you believe to be true about life in general

 

____1. Hard work will bring results and/or success

 

____2. In life: you get out what you put in

 

____3. When the road gets tough try, try again

 

____4. Hard work is its own reward

 

____5. Anyone can succeed as long as they are determined

 

Name: ______________________________                    Class Hour:______________

 

CINQUAIN POEM

 

A cinquain poem is made up five lines that represent a concept. We’ve been talking about determination, and now I want you to think about what determination means to you. Follow the directions below for writing a cinquain, but use the word “determination” as the first word in the poem. There is an example on this page, so don’t just copy it, make up your own. Write your poem on this page and hand it in before class tomorrow. 

 

Directions for writing a cinquain poem:

1.      Line one is a word title (“Determination” for this poem)

2.      Line two is two words that describe the title.

3.      Line three is three words expressing an action.

4.      Line four is four words expressing a feeling (must be either a four word sentence, or two pairs of words).

5.      Line five in another word for the title (one word)

Here’s an example:

Determination

Goals, Intention

Persevering, Enduring, Believe

Personal strength of mind

Succeed

Now write your own!

Determination

 

_______________    _______________

 

____________    ____________    ____________

 

_________________________________________

 

___________________

NAME:_______________________________        Class Hour:__________

Song Lyric Writing Homework

 

Purpose: I want you to think about determination and struggles in your own life, and write a song that reflects your success and determination of a situation.

 

Directions: In the space provided, or on a separate piece of paper, write in verses, using the “Nobody Knows” chorus as your chorus line. Write song lyrics; it can be a rap song, or another type of song. Make sure your lyrics express the value of determination, and/or a trial that you overcame in your own life.

 

 

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Nobody told me that the road would be easy, yeah
I don't believe, I've made it this far
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
Nobody told me that the road would be easy (Whoaaaaaa, that the road)
I can't believe, I've made it this far (Whoo, yeahhh)

 

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Nobody told me that the road would be easy, yeah
I don't believe, I've made it this far
My whole life, man I've been workin so hard and I know
Nobody told me that the road would be easy (Whoaaaaaa, that the road)
I can't believe, I've made it this far (Whoo, yeahhh)

Lesson #9

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives —determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 4/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Tales and their tellers”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to invent their own folktale that explain how something came to be (cause/effect).

·        Students will be able to recognize key attributes of narration in folktales.

·        Students will answer questions that focus on various levels of cognitive complexities.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will hand out the different level question sheet, then the students read selected folktales out loud, and get into groups and discuss folktales.

 

Assessment: The teacher will observe the students as they read their songs aloud to see if they understand the importance of determination. Also, the teacher will observe the students during group discussion to see if they are able to identify the various narrative purposes for folktale writing. The students will work on the different level question sheet questions during class time.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared the following handouts: pattern guide, group discussion sheet, and folktale assignment. The students should have completed their song lyric homework, cause/effect pattern guide homework sheet, and they should have read the assigned folktales in preparation for today’s class.

 

 

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Ask for volunteers to read, sing, or rap their songs (10 minutes)

·        Collect homework assignments from the previous day.

·        Hand out the level question sheet and give students time to work on it during class. (10 minutes)

·        Have the students read the three folktales out loud (15 minutes)

·        Tell students to get into groups of three and four and complete the group worksheet (15 minutes)

 

Conclusion: Remind the students that their speeches and question sheets are due tomorrow. Make sure that the students hand in their group discussion sheet before they leave class.

 

 

 

Questions for English Thematic Unit:

 

Directions: Answer the following questions on a separate piece of paper.

 

Comparing

 1.What do you think some differences in achievement would be between someone who

    endured challenges and used determination as a motivator, and someone who gave up

    and became discouraged?

 

Relating cause and effect

2.What would most likely be the results if someone worked hard and if they were 

   determined to succeed?

 

Justifying

3.Do you think that determination would help someone succeed? Why?

 

Summarizing

4.What have been some of the major points in this unit study?

 

Generalizing

5.Explain what this statement means to you: Anybody has the chance for success.

 

Inferring

6.What would you do if you encountered some of the same challenges that the characters

    in our study faced? Do you think you would have persevered? Use specific examples.

 

Classifying

7.Group the following items according to their likelihood of succession.

a. Determination                                                                             1.Failure

b. Sense of failure                                                                           2.Disappointment

c. Weakness                                                                                               3.Expectations

d. Hope                                                                                          4.Success

 

Creating

8.Think of words related to the word ENDURE and create and acronym for the word.

 

Applying

9. We’ve been reading about struggles and determinations.

    Now, write a brief summary about a struggle or challenge that you overcame.

Analyzing

10. In accordance to the question above: What helped you overcome that challenge?

 

Evaluating

11. What would you have changed about your behavior in the situation?

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet

 

For Reading on Folktales

 

Group Member Names:________________________________________________

 

Directions: These questions should be answered as a group, during group discussion, but every individual must turn in a copy with the names of all group members. Everyone should turn one of these sheets in. turn in this sheet, with the group answers AT THE END OF THE HOUR! Write on the back if you need more room.

 

5.      How do the three author’s use folktales to convey their messages?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.      What type narrative perspective do the author’s use to convey their messages?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.      For what purposes do they use those perspectives?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.      How are folktales different from songs?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet-- Continued

 

For Reading on Folktales

 

 

 

9.      What type of language do the author’s use in folktales? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10.  Does this language help to support their purpose for storytelling?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11.  How are folktales similar to children’s stories? Use a specific example.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12.   Do you think folktales are similar to classic myths or legends? Why or why not?

 

 

Folktale story assignment

Purpose: Folktales are stories that have been passed down from generation to generation. Often times, folktales are used to explain why things are the way they are (like in the Zora Neale Hurston story). I want you to think about something and explain why it is this way (cause/effect). It could be about why the sky is blue, why birds go south for the winter, etc. Use the questions that your group discussed to think about the purposes for folktales; I want to see that you understand this in your story.

 

Directions:

·        First, think about something that you want to explain why it is the way it is.

·        Come up with a folktale that explains why it is that way. Use can use any type of language play that you’d like. Do worry about spelling!

·        Type your story in 12 pt. double-spaced font—it should be at least one page long and it should have a title.

 

This assignment will be do two days form today’s date!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #10

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 5/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Preach your speech”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to dramatize original speeches.

·        Students will be able to display their comprehension about narrative perspectives in speeches.

·        Students will be able to present persuasive speeches

 

Activities: Today the students will present their speeches

 

Assessment: The students will present their speeches—check for understanding of narrative approaches in speaking. In their reflective journals, students should write a self-reflection about their speech presentation.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared the individual speech scoring rubrics, and the binder requirement sheet for weeks 1&2. The students should have their speeches ready to present, and should also have their question answer homework sheet completed to hand in.

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Collect homework questions

·        The teacher should have the students present their speeches, and collect their speeches and papers as they present. (45 minutes)

·        Before class ends, the teacher should hand out the binder requirement sheet for week 1&2.

 

Conclusion:  The teacher should remind the students that the folktale stories are due the next class period. The teacher should give the students the reading assignment for next week: “ A Raisin in the Sun”. The teacher should tell the students to write a self-reflection about their speech presentations.

 

 

 

BINDER/PORTFOLIO REQUIREMENTS—For 1st & 2ndWeek

 

As you know, you are required to keep a binder for this unit with all of your assignments, readings and note sheets. This is just a reminder, so you are aware of what assignments and readings we have done so far. I want you to stay organize and to be well prepared for the binder checks at the end of this unit study. I might have not handed some of these assignments back yet, but make sure that you’ve at least handed them in; you should put them in your binder as soon as they are returned! If, for some unforeseeable reason, you have not read all the assigned readings on this list, be sure to read them because you will be tested on the information in the readings! Remember, you can revise any assignments and put the revisions in your final portfolio.

 

Readings:

·        Chapter II from The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

·        Chapter IIV from The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

·        “Douglass” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

·        “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden

·        “I have a Dream”, by Martin Luther King Jr.

·        “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention” by Sojourner Truth.

·        “Nobody Knows” by Nelly

·        “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris

·        “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        “”Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

 

In class note sheets:

·        Narration Part I: First-person

·        Affixation

·        Narration Part II: Third-person

 

Group Assignment Sheets:

·        On readings from Olaudah Equiano

·        On readings by Frederick Douglass

·        For reading on Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        On folktale readings: “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris, “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston, “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

 

 

 

 

Binder/Portfolio requirements—For 1st & 2ndWeek Continued

In Class Assignments:

·        Affix worksheet

·        Word deconstruction worksheet

·        Third-person Frederick Douglass reflection writing

·        Article homework assignment

·        Three-level guide

·        Cinquain poems

 

Homework/Assignments:

·        Middle Passage First-person narration assignment

·        Frederick Douglass found poem

·        Third-person omniscient point of view poem

·        Five word definition sheets

·        “Value of Reading” grade sheet

·        Song lyric writing

·        Answers to Unit Questions

·        Reflective speech paper

Journal Reflections:

·        Summary on thoughts about the Middle Passage

·        Summary of Frederick Douglass readings

·        Reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

·        One-page personal journal reflection on the “I have a Dream” speech

 

Coming up…

·        Folktale stories are due the next class period.

·        Make sure to read “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry for next week

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speech Research Presentation Rubric Sheet

Student Name:______________________       Speech Title:______________

Key: 1-Very poor, 2-poor, 3-average, 4-good, 5-excellent

Points for Speech

Points earned

5pts. Possible

Skill description

 

Shows knowledge of assigned readings

 

Displays personal opinion

 

Identifies key issues of the article/Persuasive

 

Identifies intended audience and title

 

No longer than 2 minutes

 

___________=Total points out of 25

 

Points for Reflective Paper

Points earned

5pts. Possible

Descriptions for paper

 

1-2 pages long

 

Correct spelling grammar and mechanics

 

Copy of the article used

 

Answers question #1

 

Answers question #2

 

Answers question #3

 

Answers question #4

 

Answers question #5

 

Answers question #6

 

___________=Total points out of 45     Assignment total:_________/70pts.

Overview of Week 3

Standards Addressed

NCTE/IRA: 1; 2; 3; 5; 8; 9

MDE: 1.1; 1.2; 1.3; 1.4; 1.5; 2.1; 2.2; 2.3; 3.6; 3.7; 5.1; 5.3; 6.3; 7.3; 8.2; 8.5; 9.2; 10.1; 11.2; 12.1; 12.4

Read

·        Drama: “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry

·        Poem: “A Raisin in the Sun” by Langston Hughes

·        Poem: “Equality” by Therese Howard

·        Biography: Short biography of Maya Angelou

·        Drama: “Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes

·        Poem: “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou

Concepts/Input

·        Online Scavenger Hunt: introduces word origins/etymologies, commonly misused words, new vocabulary, and online research techniques.

·        Second person narration: purpose and use

·        Drama: script techniques, extraneous elements, story telling approaches, perspective analysis

·        Drama vs. Film—Multiple perspective story telling

·        Compare/Contrast narrative approaches in poetry

·        Biographies vs. Autobiographies—narrative perspectives

·        Achievements and success of Maya Angelou

·        Comprehensive exam

·        Comprehensive unit portfolio

Student Assignments   

In Class Assignments:

·        Vocabulary Scavenger Hunt

Completed In class note sheets:

·        Narration Part III: Second-person

Completed Group Assignment Sheets:

·        On reading “A Raisin in the Sun”

Homework/Assignments:

·        Folktale stories

·        Second-person perspective homework assignment

·        Multiple perspectives homework assignment

·        TV—BIO assignment

Journal Reflections:

·        “Raisin in the Sun” reflection

Lesson #11

 

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 2/Day: 5/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Searching for Words”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to complete questions based on the six types of vocabulary tasks

·        Students will be able to research various questions on the computer as they investigate specific attributes of a web site.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will ask for volunteers to read folktales, the class will discuss the group answers on folktales, and then the class will go to the media center so the students can use the computers for an on-line vocabulary scavenger hunt.

 

Assessment: The teacher will observe the students as they read their folktales, and engage the class in a discussion about the previous day’s group work to check the students understanding of the various perspectives used in folktales.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have reserved time in the media center for computer use, and should have also created the on-line vocabulary scavenger hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Ask for volunteers to read folktales aloud to the class (10 minutes)

·        Collect folktales

·        Discuss group folktale assignment answers (10 minutes)

·        Take students to the media center so they can complete the on-line Scavenger Hunt. (30 minutes)

 

Conclusion: Remind the students that the Vocabulary Scavenger Hunt is due tomorrow. Also, remind them that they should have read “A Raisin in the Sun” for class tomorrow.

 

Scavenger Hunt: Six Types of Vocabulary Tasks

 

The purpose of this assignment is to help you become aware of misconceptions with word use, to recognize new word meanings, to begin to implement these new definitions into your current vocabulary, and to become interested in word origins/etymologies. 

 

Directions: Go to the Website www.drgrammar.org, and answer the following questions on a separate piece of paper.  The answers are DUE TOMORROW! So be sure to use this class computer time wisely!

 

For Question #1

·        Click on Grammar Resources on the left hand side, click on Common list of Errors, and then click on List of Errors.

1. Learning to read known words: 

Find a word that you are already familiar with, and that you’ve read before, but that you aren’t exactly sure what the meaning is. List the word and give a brief explanation of its meaning.

For Question #2

·        Click on Grammar Resources on the left hand side, and then click on Commonly confused words, and choose a word.

2. Learning new meanings for known words:

Find a word that you know the meaning of, but that also has a meaning that you aren’t familiar with.  List the word and give an explanation of your previous knowledge of the word’s meaning, and then compare it to the new meaning that you’ve found.

 

For Question #3

·        Click on Word Origins on the left hand side, and then click on World Wide Words, and find a word.

3. Learning new words representing known concepts:

Find a new compound word, one like the ones we’ve been working with (ex: Cyber-culture). Make sure the word contains two words that you already know the meanings of.  On the basis of your previous knowledge, make an assumption of the word’s meaning, and justify your answers with brief definitions of your assumed meanings.  Then, look up the history of the word and compare it the information to your assumed meaning.

 

For Question #4

·        Click on Word Origins on the left hand side, and then click on World Wide Words, and find a word.

4. Learning new words representing new concepts:

Find a word that you’ve never heard of, and then look up the definition. After you’ve found the definition, look up the historical origin of that word. How does the historical origin compare to the definition?

 

For Question #5

·        Click on Grammar Resources on the left hand side, and then click on Notorious Confusables or Commonly Confused Words, and choose a pair of words.

5. Clarifying and enriching the meanings of known words:

Find two words that are similar, having only one letter difference. Pick two words that you are not able to distinguish the meanings of. List the words and explain how the words differ in their meaning.

 

For Question #6

·        Click on Word Origins on the left hand side, and then click on World Detective, and choose a word.

6. Moving words into students’ productive vocabularies:

Find a word that you understand the definition of, but that you rarely use in your writing. What is the word? What is its meaning? How could you use it in a common sentence? Write a common sentence using the word.

 

 

Possible Answers for Scavenger Hunt

 

Each student’s answers will vary because they will each choose different words, but the basic outline of answer construction should be the same.

Ex: Answers

 

1. Learning to read new words: Consensus—An agreement or compromise between a group/groups of people—a general agreement.

2. Learning new meanings for known words: Spine—The part of a book that holds the pages together. The spine is generally referred to as the part of the back.  The spine of a book is similar to the spine of the back because they are both centered, and because they are both located in the back or foundation of the body/book.

3.Learning new words representing known concepts: Post-Modern—A name that is used to represent recent literature—texts that have arrived after the Modern literature. Most of these texts have been written within the last forty years.

4.Learning new words representing new concepts: Derivation—a term that is used in English to represent the affixation changes of root and base words that change the lexical category and the meaning of those words. Derivation originated in the East Asian countries as a term that was used to measure the changes in number continuums.  It relates to word derivation because they both represent change.

 

5. Clarifying and enriching the meanings of known words: Allusion/Illusion—Allusion is an image or reference to another existing work, play, character, story, etc. Not to be confused with Illusion, which would be considered as a false impression or delusional perception.

 6. Moving words into students’ productive vocabularies: Syntax—Used as a term that represents the internal structure of a word.

“The sentence’s syntax was brilliant and perfectly constructed”.

 

 

 

 

Lesson #12

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 3/Day: 2/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “I’m talkin’ to YOU!”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify the aspects of second-person narrative perspective.

·        Students will be able to apply what they know about second-person narrative opinion piece by writing a letter to one of the characters from “A Raisin in the Sun”.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will go over the in class notes, read a poem out loud, and will discuss key concepts of drama script (drama vs. narrative). Then the students will form groups and answer the questions on the group worksheet.

 

Assessment: The students will be asked to write a second person narrative letter to one of the characters from the play in order to display their comprehension of second-person narrative; it will also assess their comprehension of the drama script reading. The teacher will observe the students during group work to determine if they are able to identify key aspects of narrative in relation to drama (compare/contrast). The students should also write a reflective journal entry about the poem “equality” that will assess their ability to make inferences about the intended audience; they must justify their responses.

 

 

 

Preparation: The teacher should have previously prepared the in class note sheet, and copies of the second-person narrative poem to hand out to the class, and the second-person perspective homework assignment sheet. The students should have read “A Raisin in the Sun”, in preparation for group discussion.

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Collect students’ Vocabulary Scavenger Hunt answers

·        Go over the in class note sheet (10 minutes)

·        Read the poem “Equality” aloud to the class, and explain how it relates to second-person narrative. (10 minutes)

·        Teacher will discuss key attributes of narrative perspective in relation to drama script. (10 minutes)

·        Students should form groups of three and four and answer the questions on the group discussion sheet. (20 minutes)

·        Hand out second-person perspective homework assignment.

 

Conclusion: Remind the students to hand in their group discussion sheets before they leave class. Also, remind the students that their homework is due tomorrow. The students should also write a reflective journal entry about the poem “Equality” –ask them to think about who they believe the intended audience is, who the speaker is, and what clues led them to these conclusions.

 

 

NARRATION

Part III: Second-PERSON                                      

In Class Fill-in-the-blanks notes

 

Second-Person narration is very different from the other writing approaches. It is the least common approach of storytelling out of all three approaches, and it is usually thought of as the most difficult to write.

    

This type of narrative approach uses the ___(“you”)___ as the ____(listener)____, or the _____(person)____ being ____(spoken)___  ___(to)____. The “you” is not always clearly identified. 

 

When writing in this type of narrative style, a writer should always make sure that the ___(reader)___ is able to ___(identify)___ ___(who)___ the “you” is ____(referring)___ to. Generally, the “I” is also identified because the “I” is telling their feelings, thoughts or emotions to the “you”.

 

EX: I can’t believe you let my dog out of the backyard. You just came to check the meter, but I thought that you would have made sure that the gate was closed. You’re inconsiderate behavior really upset me.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Group Assignment Discussion Answer Sheet

 

For Reading on “A Raisin in the Sun”

 

Group Member Names:________________________________________________

 

Directions: These questions should be answered as a group, during group discussion, but every individual must turn in a copy with the names of all group members. Everyone should turn one of these sheets in. turn in this sheet, with the group answers AT THE END OF THE HOUR! Write on the back if you need more room.

 

1.      How does drama script differ from general story telling techniques?

 

 

 

 

 

2.      Could you identify a narrator in the story?

 

 

 

 

3.      What attributes/elements of a story and the characters does drama script leave out?

 

 

 

 

 

4.      How does the character dialogue help to tell the story?

 

 

 

 

 

5.      If you were to see this play preformed, what attributes would help to tell the story?

 

 

 

 

 

6.      If the script were always the same, then why would various performances of the play be different?

 

 

Second Person Narrative Homework Assignment

 

 

Purpose: As you have observed, drama and second person narrative are very different from each other, and they are both very different from general storytelling techniques. I want to make sure that you can comprehend drama script reading, and also that you understand how second person narrative is used.

 

Directions:

·        Pick a character from “A Raisin in the Sun” and think about something they did, or didn’t do, that you have an opinion about.

·        I want you to write a letter to that person, describing your feelings—using a second person narrative approach, but don’t identify yourself in the letter.

·        You letter should be at least one page long, you can hand write it if you’d like.

·        Make sure you identify the character that you are speaking to.

 

 

YOUR LETTER IS DUE TOMORROW!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EQUALITY

By Therese Howard

 

You declare you see me dimly

Through a glass which will not shine

Thought I stand before you boldly

Trim in rank and marking time

 

You do own to hear me faintly

As a whisper out of range,

While my drums beat out the message

And the rhythms never change.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

You announce my ways are wanton,

That fly from man to man,

But if I’m just a shadow to you,

Could you ever understand?

 

We have lived a painful; history,

We know the shameful past,

But I keep on marching forward,

And you keep on coming last.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

Take the blinders from your vision,

Take the padding from your ears,

and confess you’ve heard me crying,

And admit you’ve seen my tears.

 

Hear the tempo so compelling,

hear the blood throb in my veins,

Yes, my drums beat nightly,

And the rhythms never change.

 

Equality, and I will be free.

Equality, and I will be free.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #13

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 3/Day: 3/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Everyone’s got a different story to tell”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify extraneous elements that help to tell a story in performance and film.

·        Students will be able to develop two narrative approaches to the same story.

·        Students will be able to recognize various perspectives of the same story.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will go over the discussion questions from the previous day and then students will watch the same part of two different movies based on the play “A Raisin in the Sun”. Finally, the students will be given the perspective worksheet as homework.

 

Assessment: The teacher will ask the students questions about the group discussion form the previous class, in order to assess their ability to identify how drama relates to and differs from storytelling narration. Also, the students will create two perspectives for the same story in order to display their understanding of multiple perspectives.

 

Preparation: In preparation for today, the teacher should have brought two versions of the movie “A Raisin in the Sun” (based on the play). The teacher should have brought copies of the perspective assignment to hand out to the students. Also, the students should have their letters ready to hand in.

 

 

Input/Modeling:

 

·        Collect second person narrative home work assignment

·        Discuss answers to group questions and elements of drama performance that help to tell the story: actor identities, actor emotions, acting choices, set, wardrobe, language choice, lighting, etc. (10 minutes)

·        Show the last 15 minutes of each movie (30 minutes)

·        Discuss the major differences in the movies. Discuss how these different elements alter the narrative perspectives and intended audience reactions to the play. Discuss how the movies differ from the play version—what attributes help to tell the story in the movie. (10 minutes)

·        Hand out perspective writing homework sheet

·        Hand out readings for next class period

·        Hand out the Langston Hughes poem and reflection directions.

 

Conclusion: Remind students that the multiple perspectives writing homework is due tomorrow. Also remind students to read the short Maya Angelou Biography and the poems for tomorrow.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name: ________________________________Class Hour:____________

 

Multiple perspective story writing homework

 

You may write in the space provided to complete the first part of this assignment, but the second par must be typed and double-spaced, using 12pt. font.

 

Purpose: The purpose of this assignment is to help you to see that there are always two sides to every story (if not more), and as readers, we must always be aware that there are multiple ways to read stories. Just because two people read the same story doesn’t mean that they view it the same, and just because we are only given one character’s perspective, it doesn’t mean that that is the only way to look at the story. Begin to think about these things as you read the assigned readings, start to think about how the other characters feel about what is happening, and think about the different ways that different readers would view the stories. 

 

Part I.

Directions: Think about an argument that you had with someone else, and try to remember all of the details. If you don’t want to put the person’s name, you don’t have to, just make one up. In the space below, write a brief story/summary of what happened, why the argument occurred, why you felt you were right, and your feelings about the outcome. Don’t worry, you won’t be judged on my opinion of the situation, just be honest, but no profanity! If you need more room, use the back of this sheet.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Now, in the space below, write a brief summary/story from the other person’s, or another person’s perspective. Write it as if you were that person, so it should read like a first-person narrative. Don’t bring your opinions about the situation into the other person’s perspective—I don’t care who’d right or wrong—try and become that person and tell the story how you think they would.

 

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Don’t forget Part II on the next page!

 

 

Part II.

 

Directions: For the second part of this assignment pick one of the following situations provided, or make up your own, and make up a story that follows the concept of dual perspectives. I want you to make up a story that would have two completely different explanations about what happened. Remember, for each story you may be a different gender, age, etc., so you may need to use a different tone or a different writing style. Make sure this part is typed and double-spaced, using 12pt. font. You should write two stories, one story from each of the different perspectives.

 

Maybe write stories about…

·        A car accident: the person that got hit, and the person that caused the accident.

·        A breakup: the person who broke up with the other person, and the person who got their heart broken

·        Someone served the wrong food: the customer, and the waiter/waitress.

·        A bad grade: the teacher, and the student

·        A store robbery: the cashier, and the robber 

·        You can come up with your own, but make sure it has two different views about the situation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Journal Reflection Directions

 

Lorainne Hansberry got the title “A Raisin in the Sun” from a Langston Hughes poem. I’d like you to read the poem by Langston Hughes and think about how the drama relates to it. Write a 1-page journal reflection about how the different authors use the concept and phrase “A Raisin in the Sun”. What does this title, “A Raisin in the Sun” refer to in both the drama and the poem? Which piece do you think expresses the concept better?

 

“A Raisin in the Sun”

By Langston Hughes

 

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up

like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore—

And then run?

Does it stink like rotten meat?

Or crust and sugar over—

Like a syrupy sweet?

 

Maybe it just sags

Like a heavy load

 

Or does it explode?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #14

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 3/Day: 4/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Turning TV into a biography”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to identify the key attributes and purposes of biographies.

·        Students will be able to recognize the success and achievement of Maya Angelou.

·        Students will be able to compare and contrast the various narrative approaches between selected poems.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will give a brief review of the elements in a biography, and the teacher will discuss Maya Angelou with the class. The students will then read the selected poems out loud: “Still I rise” by Maya Angelou, and “Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes. The teacher will hand out the binder/portfolio requirement direction sheet, and will review for the unit exam.

 

Assessment: The teacher will have the students convert their knowledge of a television character into a short biography summary in order to display their ability to differentiate between biographies and autobiographies. The teacher will go over the summary exam sheet in order to ensure the students’ knowledge of the main concepts in this unit study. Also, the teacher will discuss the variations of narrative perspectives in the poems for today, in order to assess the students’ ability to identify specific narrative perspectives.

 

 

Preparation: In preparation for today’s class, the teacher should have previously prepared three class handouts: exam concepts review sheet, binder/portfolio requirement sheet, and the TV-BIO homework sheet. The students should have read the assigned reading for the day, and should have also completed the multiple perspective story homework.

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Collect Multiple Perspective Story homework

·        Give a brief review of the key attributes and purposes of biographies, and discuss Maya Angelou’s biography summary with the class.

 (15 minutes)

·        Students should read selected poems out loud, and then engage in a class discussion about the narrative approaches and purposes for each poem.

Discussion questions like:

-“What are the purposes of these poems?”

-“Are the messages clearly related? How”

-“What approaches do the authors use to convey their messages?”

-“Do you think one approach is better than the other?”

-“Is the message more clearly identified in one of the poems?   

   How?”(10 minutes)

·        Review for exam, and handout review sheet. Answer any questions that students may have. (20 minutes)

·        Hand out and explain binder/portfolio requirement direction sheet (5 minutes)

 

Conclusion: Remind students that the exam is tomorrow, and that their TV-BIO homework is also due tomorrow.

“Mother to Son”

By Langston Hughes

 

Well, son, I’ll tell you:

Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

It had tacks on it,

And splinters,

And boards torn up,

And places with no carpet on the floor—

Bare.

But all the time

I’se been a-climbin’ on,

And reachin’ landin’s,

And turnin’ corners,

And sometimes goin’ in the dark

Where there ain’t been no light.

So, boy, don’t you turn back.

Don’t you set down on those steps

‘Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.

Don’t you fall now—

For I’se still goin honey,

I’se still climbin’,

And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Still I Rise”

By Maya Angelou

 

You may right me down in history

With your bitter, twisted lies,

You may trod me in the very dirt,

But still, like dust, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sassiness upset you?

Why are you beset with gloom?

‘Cause I’ll walk like I’ve got oil wells

Pumping in my living room.

 

Just like moons and like suns,

With the certainty of tides,

Just like hope springing high,

Still I’ll rise.

 

Did you want to see me broken?

Bowed head and lowered eyes?

Shoulders falling down like teardrops,

Weakened by me soulful cries.

 

Does my haughtiness offend you?

Don’t you take it awful hard

‘Cause I laugh like I’ve got gold mines

Diggin’ in my own back yard.

 

You may shoot me with your words,

You may cut me with your eyes,

You may kill me with your hatefulness,

But still, like air, I’ll rise.

 

Does my sexiness upset you?

Does it come as a surprise

That I dance like I’ve got diamonds

At the meeting of my thighs?

 

Out of the huts of history’s shame

I rise

Up from a past that’s rooted in pain

I rise

I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide,

Welling and swelling, I bear in the tide.

Leaving behind nights of terror and fear

I rise

Into a daybreak that’s wounderously clear

I rise

Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,

I am the dream and the hope of a slave.

I rise

I rise

I rise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Binder/Portfolio Requirements Direction Sheet

Your portfolios should include all of the writing assignments, and other projects or reflections that we have done for this unit. Also, make sure that you include all of the handed out readings. If, for some unforeseeable reason, you have not read all the assigned readings on this list, be sure to read them because you will be tested on the information in the readings! Remember, you can revise any assignments and put the revisions in your final portfolio. If you choose to revise any of the pieces in the portfolio, you must include a statement that will tell me what you revised, how you revised it, and why you choose to revise it.

Your portfolio should include the following

(All neatly organized in a three-ringed binder):

·        A cover page with name, class, date, etc.

·        A table of contents

·        Grade log

·        A reflection paper that should identify, individually, what you have learned from the unit’s readings, writing assignments, and discussions. (1-2 pages)

·        A personal reflection about your goals, and aspirations for the future, and how you plan to achieve these goals. State how determination and perseverance will help you to achieve these goals.

·        Any revision statements along with revisions and original pieces

Readings:

·        Chapter II from The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

·        Chapter IIV from The Narrative Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave

·        “Douglass” by Paul Laurence Dunbar

·        “Frederick Douglass” by Robert Hayden

·        “I have a Dream”, by Martin Luther King Jr.

·        “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention” by Sojourner Truth.

·        “Nobody Knows” by Nelly

·        “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris

·        “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        “A Raisin in the Sun” by Lorraine Hansberry

·        “A Raisin in the Sun” by Langston Hughes

·        “Equality” by Therese Howard

·        Short biography of Maya Angelou

·        “Mother to Son” by Langston Hughes

·        “Still I Rise” by Maya Angelou

Completed In class note sheets:

·        Narration Part I: First-person

·        Affixation

·        Narration Part II: Third-person

·        Narration Part III: Second-person

 

Completed Group Assignment Sheets:

·        On readings from Olaudah Equiano

·        On readings by Frederick Douglass

·        For reading on Speeches: Martin King jr. “I Have a Dream”, and “Speech to the Women’s Rights Convention”, by Sojourner Truth.

·        On folktale readings: “How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox” by Joel Chandler Harris, “How to Write a Letter” by Zora Neale Hurston, “Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men” by Zora Neale Hurston

·        On reading “A Raisin in the Sun”

In Class Assignments:

·        Affix worksheet

·        Word deconstruction worksheet

·        Third-person Frederick Douglass reflection writing

·        Article homework assignment

·        Three-level guide

·        Cinquain poems

·        Vocabulary Scavenger Hunt

Homework/Assignments:

·        Middle Passage First-person narration assignment

·        Frederick Douglass found poem

·        Third-person omniscient point of view poem

·        Five word definition sheets

·        “Value of Reading” grade sheet

·        Song lyric writing

·        Answers to Unit Questions

·        Reflective speech paper

·        Folktale stories

·        Second-person perspective homework assignment

·        Multiple perspectives homework assignment

·        TV—BIO assignment

Journal Reflections:

·        Summary on thoughts about the Middle Passage

·        Summary of Frederick Douglass readings

·        Reflection about Frederick Douglass from a third person perspective.

·        One-page self-reflective journal entry on the “I have a Dream” speech

·        “Raisin in the Sun” reflection

 

YOUR PORTFOLIO WILL BE DUE THE FIRST DAY OF NEXT WEEK!

 

 

TV—BIO Assignment

 

 

Purpose: We’ve recently been studying biographies, and a couple of weeks ago we look at some autobiographies. I want you to be able to understand, and think about, how biographies are written, how they relate to stories, and how third-person narration helps to create them.

Directions:

·        Watch a television show, sports game, news show, etc.

·        Pick a character or person from the program.

·        Write a 1 ½ -2 page biography on that person

·        If you choose a character from a show, write the biography on the character, not the actor/actress.

·        If there are facts about the person, like their age, that you’re unsure of, be creative and just make something up that seems reasonable.

·        Be sure to write the biography like to one we looked at

·        Don’t include “I”

·        If you have any personal opinions about this person/character, then they should be stated as facts, not as your opinion.

·        Remember, this should be written from a third-person narrative perspective because you are basically telling a story about someone else.

 

This Assignment is DUE TOMORROW!

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXAM Review Sheet

 

Narrative Perspectives—Determination Unit Exam Review

 

In preparation for tomorrow’s exam, you should be able to:

 

·        Comprehend all the readings from this unit

·        Identify the various narrative perspectives that are used in the readings

·        Match the readings to their genres

·        Recognize all three types of narrative perspectives and their sub-categories

·        Explain what narrative perspectives are best used in various genres of writing

·        Apply word deconstruction techniques to interpret meanings of words

·        Separate prefixes and suffixes from root words

·        Recognize the significance of affixes in relation to simple and complex words.

·        Evaluate purposes for various narrative perspectives

·        Compare and contrast different genres

·        Compare and contrast different narratives

·        Determine what genres are best used for various perspectives

·        Recall facts about various authors

·        Match the authors to their writing

·        Develop various genres of writing using multiple perspectives

·        Recognize key facts about the Middle Passage

·        Apply previous readings to the concept of narration and purpose

·        Identify the key attributes of persuasive speeches

·        Recognize key attributes of narration in folktales

·        Identify extraneous elements that help to tell a story in performance and film

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson #15

 

Unit Title: Narrative Perspectives—determination

Grade Level: 9th

Week: 3/Day: 5/ Class Time: 50 minutes

Lesson Title: “Test time!”

 

Lesson Objectives:

·        Students will be able to display their knowledge of the unit’s readings

·        Students will be able to demonstrate their knowledge of the concepts taught in this unit.

 

Activities: Today the teacher will collect the TV—Bio homework, and will hand out the unit exam.

 

Assessment: The teacher will have the students take a comprehensive exam that covers the concepts taught in this unit, in order to assess their level of understanding.

 

Preparation: For today, the teacher should have previously prepared handouts of the unit exam. The students should have studied for the exam, and they should also have their TV—BIO assignments ready to turn in.

 

Input/Modeling:

·        Collect student homework

·        Go over the exam directions, and hand it out to the students (50 minutes)

 

Conclusion Make sure all the students hand in the exam, and remind them that their portfolios are due the next class period.

Narrative Perspectives—Determination

Unit Exam

 

Name: _________________________              Class Hour:___________

 

 

Directions:

 Please carefully read the directions and questions for each section of the exam. Don’t forget to put your name on this exam sheet! If you have questions about any of the exam questions, please feel free to quietly come up and ask me. Be respectful to your peers, and keep quiet during the examination; if you finish early find something to do—quietly, to yourself. You will have the whole class hour to finish the exam. Be sure to double-check your answers! Don’t hurry through the exam; this is not a race—take your time. Cheating of any kind is not permitted! If you are caught cheating you will automatically receive a zero on the exam, and it may cause you to fail this course. We are all smart learners, so I expect only the best from you. Good Luck!

 

 

 

 

 

1. Directions: Match the appropriate genre to the readings in the space provided

 

D______1.The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

C______ 2.“Douglass”

C______ 3.“Frederick Douglass”

F______ 4.“I have a Dream”,

G______ 5.“Nobody Knows”

H______ 6.“How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox”

H______ 7.“How to Write a Letter”

H______ 8.“Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men”

C______ 9.“A Raisin in the Sun”

A______ 10.“A Raisin in the Sun”

C______ 11.“Equality”

C______ 12.“Mother to Son”

C______ 13.“Still I Rise”

 

A.    Drama

B.    Letter

C.    Poem

D.   Autobiography

E.    Biography

F.     Speech

G.   Song

H.   Folktale

 

 

2. Directions: In the space provided, identify if the readings are written in first-person, second person, or third-person narration.

FP___________________1.The Narrative Life of Olaudah Equiano

TP___________________ 2.“Douglass”

TP___________________3.“Frederick Douglass”

FP___________________4.“I have a Dream”

FP__________________  5.“Nobody Knows”

TP___________________6.“How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox”

SP___________________ 7.“How to Write a Letter”

TP_________________ 8.“Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men”

TP__________________ 9.“A Raisin in the Sun” by Langston Hughes

SP___________________10.“Equality”

FP___________________11.“Mother to Son”

SP/FP___________________ 12.“Still I Rise”

 

Directions: Circle the correct answer for the following questions

 

3. In this type of narration, the story is from someone who was not present during the event, but they are giving their own personal rendition or account of the story.

A. Third-person omniscient

B. First-person re-teller

C. Third-person objective

D. First-person protagonist

E. Second person

 

4. In this type of narration, the storyteller can only tell the reader what they (the narrator/story-teller) saw, heard, or observed. Often, this type of writing allows the reader to construct his/her personal opinions of the character’s emotions based on the events, situations or interactions in the story.

 

A. Third-person omniscient

B. First-person re-teller

C. Third-person objective

D. First-person witness

E. Second person

 

5. What type of narration would the following passage be described as?

 

Sally was so distressed when she got home: her dog was nowhere to be found! She ran out and called his name, but she figured the only way she would find him was to drive around and look. She only had to drive around the block once before she saw her dog peeing in the front yard of someone else’s house; she was so embarrassed.

 

A. Second person

B. First-person re-teller

C. Third-person objective

D. First-person protagonist

E. Third person limited

 

 

6. What type of narration would the following passage be described as?

 

I can’t believe you let my dog out of the backyard. You just came to check the meter, but I thought that you would have made sure that the gate was closed. You’re inconsiderate behavior really upset me.

 

A. Second person

B. First-person re-teller

C. Third-person objective

D. First-person protagonist

E. Third person limited

 

7. What type of narration would be used in an autobiography?

A. Second person

B. First-person re-teller

C. Third-person objective

D. First-person protagonist

 

E. None of the above

 

8. What type of narration would be best used in a police report?

A. Third-person objective

B. Third person limited

C. First-person re-teller

D. First-person protagonist

E. None of the above

 

 

9. What type of narration would be best used in a folktale or story?

A.    First-person

B.    Second person

C.    Third- person

D.   None of the above

 

10. Write a brief complaint about this class, to me (your teacher), using second person narration. Answers will vary

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

11. Write a brief account of what you did this morning Answers will vary

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

12. What type of narration did you use for answer to question number 11?

___________________________________________________________

 

13. How do folktales narratives differ from speeches? Identify specific narrative perspectives to support your answer. Answers will vary

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

14. Match the following authors to their writings:

C______ 1.“Douglass”

E______ 2.“I have a Dream”,

H______ 3.“How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox”

I______ 4.“Why Women Always Take Advantage of Men”

A/J______ 5.“A Raisin in the Sun”

A______ 6..“Mother to Son”

B______ 7.“Still I Rise”

A. Langston Hughes

B. Maya Angelou

C. Paul Laurence Dunbar

D. Robert Hayden

E. Martin Luther King Jr.

F. Sojourner Truth.

G. Nelly

H. Joel Chandler Harris

I. Zora Neale Hurston

J. Lorraine Hansberry

Directions: Circle the correct answer for the following questions

 

15. If the word ‘active’ is used as an adjective and you add the affix –ate, it makes the word

 

A.    a verb

B.    a noun

C.    an adverb

D.   it remains an adjective/ there is no change

 

16. What is the root of the word ‘unreachably’?

 

A.    reachable

B.    unreach

C.   reach

D.   reachably

 

17. What part of speech is the root word in the word ‘happiness’?

 

A.    Adjective

B.    Adverb

C.    Noun

D.   Verb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18. What affixes would represent the process of affixation as (A—V—N) to make a variation of the word ‘modern’ ultimately a noun?

 

A. (ize)able

B. (ize)(at)ion

 

C. (en)ity

D. (at)ion

 

19. Word Deconstruction 

 

Directions: Answer the questions to the best of your abilities. You don’t have to use complete sentences for parts A, B, and C, but you need to for part D. Use word deconstructions techniques.

 

Use the word Antidisestablishmentarianism’ to answer the following questions:

    

A. Try to break down the word into the smallest units that you can identify

(Use dashes to break up the word). List any suffixes and prefixes and roots that are prevalent in this word.

Correct answer is: Anti/dis/establish/ment/ar/ian/ism

Looking for at least the identification of the

-prefixes: /Anti/ dis/

-suffixes: /ment/ism/

-root /establish/

 

B. Interpret the meanings of the affixes in this word. How does each individual affix alter the meaning of the word?

Looking for at least the lexical categories, and basic meanings of the previously requested affixes:

/Anti/-N (against, opposite)

/dis/-V (apart, reversed)

/ment/-N (creates a noun)

 /ism/-N (belief, practice)

 

C. Identify the root word. What does it mean? What part of speech does it belong to?

-Must identify the exact root word: establish

-Must give a basic definition of the word: to generate, to introduce, to put   

  into effect

-Must identify that the root word is a verb

 

D. Try to establish a valid conclusion of the word’s definition. What part of speech does it belong to? Use the meanings and applications of affixation to support your conclusion.

 

-Must list various affixes, root word, and combine their meanings: Anti=against, opposite /dis=apart, reversed/ establish= to generate, to introduce, to put into effect/ment=creates a noun/ism=belief, practice.

-Pull meanings together to form a hypothesis of word’s meaning (does not have to emulate exact meaning, but must show that student can form a comprehensive meaning through a simulation of word structuring).

-Must identify word as a noun.

 

 

20. List three key facts about the Middle Passage. Answers will vary

 

1. _______________________________________________________

 

2.________________________________________________________

 

3. _________________________________________________________

 

Directions: circle the correct answer for the following questions

21. Who was a major figure in the Civil Rights Movement?

A.    Frederick Douglass

B. Lorraine Hansberry

C. Olaudah Equiano

     D. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

22. When did the Civil Rights Movement occur?

A.    1920s

B.    1940s

C.    1960s

D.   1980s

 

23.How did Frederick Douglass learn how to read? Answers will vary

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

24. List three facts/concepts about the Civil Rights Movement.

Answers will vary

 

1. _______________________________________________________

 

2. ________________________________________________________

 

3. _________________________________________________________

 

25. List three goals that you have for your life.

Answers will vary

 

1. _______________________________________________________

 

2.________________________________________________________

 

3. _________________________________________________________

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

 

 

Cuban, Larry. (1992). Managing dilemmas while building professional communities. Educational Researcher, January-February, pp.4-11.

 

 

Gates, Henry Louis Jr. & McKay, Nellie Y. (1997). The Norton Anthology: African American Literature. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Company Inc. 

 

 

Nelly, Album: Suit (2004). Song: "Nobody Knows"(feat. Anthony Hamilton)

New York, NY: Universal Records

 

 

Mellor, Bronwyn & Patterson, Annette. (2002). Critical practice: Teaching “Shakespeare.” Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 43(6) pp. 508-517.

 

 

Moffett, James. (1981). Introduction: Background. In J. Moffett

Active Voice, pp. 1-26.  NJ: Boynton/Cook

 

 

Purves, Alan C., Rodgers, Theresa, &Soter, Anna O. (1995). If literature is exploration, what’s the territory and who’s the guide. In A. Purves, et al. How Porcupines Make Love III, pp.77-88. NY: Longman

 

 

Robb, Laura. (2002). Multiple texts: Multiple opportunities for teaching and learning. Voices from the Middle, v.9(4), pp. 28-32.

 

 

Stotsky, Sandra. (1994). Acedemic guidelines for selecting multi-ethnic and multicultural literature. English Journal, 83(2), pp. 27-34.