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ETHICAL ISSUES IN PHYSICS: WORKSHOP PROCEEDINGS

Eastern Michigan University

Ypsilanti, Michigan

 

Individual readers of these Proceedings may copy this material for personal use or for teaching purposes.  Copying for inclusion in another publication or for the purposes of resale may be done only with the permission of the authors.  All rights reserved.

 

Proceedings I

July 17-18, 1993

Marshall Thomsen, Editor

Proceedings 2

July 19-20, 1996

Marshall Thomsen and

Bonnie Wylo, Editors

Philosophical Foundations of Scientific Ethics

David Resnik

 

Introducing Ethical Issues in the Physics Classroom

Marshall Thomsen

 

Good to the Last Drop?

Millikan Stories as “Canned” Pedagogy

Ullica SegerstrĆle

Note: This paper is not available on this web site. It has been published in Science and Engineering Ethics Volume 1, #3 (July 1995)

 

Some Issues of Government-sponsored

Research in Industry

J. P. Sheerin

 

Physics and the Classified Community

Ruth Howes

 

Public Science

Francis Slakey

Should Physics Students Take a Course in Ethics?--Physicists Respond

Bonnie Wylo and Marshall Thomsen

 

Ethical Issues in Physics: Ethical Harassment

Carol Herzenberg

 

Research Versus Teaching: An Ethical Dilemma for the Academic Physicist

Alvin Saperstein

 

Ethics, Physics and Public Policy

Tina Kaarsberg

 

Ethical Problems and Dilemmas in the Interaction Between Science and Media

David Resnik

 

Science, Ethics, and Gender

Priscilla Auchincloss

 

Publication Practices in Physics

Marshall Thomsen........

 

The editor is grateful for the assistance of many in the organization and running of the workshop, including Rachelle Hollander, Robert Welch, Art Hobson, Ron Westrum, Jim Sheerin, and the staff of the Corporate Education Center at Eastern Michigan University.  Thanks are also due to those not involved directly with the workshop presentations who have taken time to read and comment on earlier drafts of this publication: Priscilla Auchincloss, John Thomsen, and Bonnie Wylo.  Many of their comments have been incorporated into the discussion sections.  Finally, technical assistance from Mary Jane Callison at all stages of this project is gratefully acknowledged.

              This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. SBR-9223819.  Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.  The texts of the workshop talks have been prepared by the speakers themselves.  The other material has been prepared by the editor based on discussions during the workshop and feedback from those who have read earlier drafts.  While every effort has been made to accurately reflect the facts and opinions supplied by these contributors, the editor takes full responsibility for any inaccuracies.

The editors are indebted to numerous colleagues for advice and assistance in the planning and running of the workshop as well as in the preparation of these proceedings.  In particular, we thank Rosemary Chalk, Art Hobson, David Resnik, and Francis Slakey for their advice on identifying workshop participants.  The workshop mechanics were kept smoothly running through the assistance of Mary Jane Callison, Diane Jacobs, and Cindy Marlatt as well as through the efforts of the Corporate Education Center.  We also wish to thank the participants themselves, without whom there would have been no workshop or Workshop Proceedings.  We include in this latter group Francis Slakey and Marcel LaFollette who were unable to attend but were with us in spirit.  Finally, we wish to thank Rachelle Hollander for her input in the early stages of this project.

              This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. SBR-9511817.  Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.  The texts of the workshop talks have been prepared by the speakers themselves.  The other material has been prepared by the editors based on discussions during the workshop and feedback from those who have read earlier drafts.  While every effort has been made to accurately reflect the facts and opinions supplied by these contributors, the editors take full responsibility for any inaccuracies.

 

 

 

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